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Stuart Lutz Historic Documents, Inc. monthly newsletter
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Dear autograph collector,

This newsletter features an oversized Thomas Edison signed photograph, a scrapbook kept by the family of Congressman Arthur Mitchell (the first Black Democrat elected to Congress), a fine Ronald Reagan signed book, a letter by British general William Phillips to American general Heath, a John Warren signed Humane Society document, a Dolley Madison ALS as First Lady just after the Burning of Washington, a fine Kossuth letter, a letter by New Jersey Governor William Livingston to "the Committee & Militia on Publishing the Declaration of Independency," many signed photographs (often depicting celebrities with their pets), and much more.  One reason I offer so much is that I've been busy cataloging like mad because...

In a few weeks, I will have a booth at the ABAA book fair in New York City; it is surely the finest antiquarian book show in the country, if not the world.  If you have never attended and want a complimentary pass, please email me for one; this offer is good until my ticket supply runs out.

Six of my eight great-grandparents were born in Ukraine.  One hundred years ago this spring, my grandmother Marion, aged eight, arrived at Ellis Island, along with her mother.  Her father had left the Ukrainian shtetl of Zvenyhorodka for America years before to get settled before he intended to send for his wife and infant daughter.  There is an old Yiddish saying that "Man plans and God laughs."  So their grand plans were interrupted by World War I, the Russian Revolution and the Russian Civil War, and they could not leave for many years.  My grandmother wrote her memoirs for the family and one of the greatest memories of her life was meeting her father at the pier for the first time and being carried through the streets of Manhattan by him.  For one birthday gift later in her life, we had my grandmother's name engraved in the wall at Ellis Island.  I took my son there a few years ago to see the plaque and it is very emotional for me.  I remain eternally grateful that my ancestors were courageous enough to leave Europe for America's golden door, and I am equally thankful that the United States accepted them.  It was fortunate that my family left Zvenyhorodka; between the Ukrainian terror famine known as the holodomor, the brutal Nazi occupation of Ukraine and Babi Yar, no Jews were left alive in Zvenyhorodka by the end of World War II.

Many clients knew that the only two states in which a majority of residents live on islands are Hawaii and New York.  This month's trivia is "What are the only two sets of Presidential elections in which the incumbent President lost in consecutive elections?Free shipping to the first correct reply.

Sincerely,


Stuart 

Stuart Lutz Historic Documents, Inc.
4 South Orange Avenue, #507
South Orange, NJ 07079
Toll Free Phone 1 (877) I-BUY-DOCS [428-9362]

Stuart@HistoryDocs.com
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AN OVERSIZED THOMAS EDISON SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH
 
THOMAS A. EDISON (1847-1931). Edison was an American inventor best known for inventing the electric light bulb.
 
PS. 11” x 14”. N.d. N.p. A black-and-white image signed “To Miss Barbara Ann Payne Thos. A Edison. The print reproduces a drawing of Edison in three-quarter view. Per materials that accompany the photograph, Barbara Ann, the daughter of Lillian and Judd Payne, was born in December 1926 and then mailed this image; the father was in publishing and worked for Funk & Wagnalls, among other companies.  Photographs of this size are much scarcer than normal 8” x 10” Edison signed photos.  It is generally in fine condition with the extreme upper right corner missing and light chipping and faults to the margins.  $3,250.00
A RARE DOLLEY MADISON AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED AS FIRST LADY JUST AFTER THE BURNING OF WASHINGTON
 
DOLLEY MADISON (1768-1849). Madison was First Lady of the United States – the wife of President James Madison. As First Lady during the 1814 burning of Washington D.C. by British forces, she is sometimes credited with saving treasures from the White House (specifically the portrait of George Washington) and then decorating the new White House.
 
HENRY ALEXANDER SCAMMELL DEARBORN (1783-1851).  Dearborn, the son of a famous general, was a lawyer, author, public servant, soldier and the head of the Boston Customs House.
 
ALS. 1pg. October 18, 1814. Washington. An autograph letter signed in the third person Mrs. Madison. Less than two months after British forces burned Washington D.C., including the White House, Madison wrote to Henry Dearborn, Jr. She requested him to send several luxuries to Washington: “Mrs. Madison presents her best respects to her friend Mr. H. Dearborn & requests the favor of him to send by Mr. Van Zandt the cologne water almond paste & as much of the sweet meats & cordial as he may be able to bring, or send to Washington.”  Nicholas Biddle Van Zandt (1780–1863), formerly of New York, was married to Martha Wood Southall Van Zandt, a cousin of Dolley Madison.  The letter is in very good condition.  Autograph Dolley Madison letters signed as First Lady are quite rare.  American Book Prices Current only shows two Madison ALsS as First Lady ever selling.  $3,000.00
A FAMILY SCRAPBOOK OF THE POLITICAL CAREER OF ARTHUR W. MITCHELL, THE FIRST BLACK DEMOCRAT ELECTED TO CONGRESS
 
ARTHUR W. MITCHELL (1883-1968).  Mitchell was the first Black Democrat elected to Congress.  He served Illinois from 1935 to 1943, and he was the only Black member during that time.  Born in Alabama, he attended the Tuskegee Institute, Columbia University and Harvard University.  Although Mitchell was a Republican early in life, he switched parties in 1932 with the election of Franklin Roosevelt.  In 1934, he defeated the Black Congressman Oscar De Priest.  Much of his time in Congress was spent introducing anti-lynching and anti-discrimination bills.
 
Scrapbook. Approximately 50 pages. Circa mid 1930s.  A scrapbook covering the early political career of Congressman Arthur W. Mitchell; it was kept by Harriet Mitchell in Birmingham, Alabama (this is likely his sister, as Congressman Mitchell was from Alabama).  The scrapbook mostly consists of press clippings, many with original halftone images of Mitchell.  The origin of the clippings is clearly marked, and many of them are from prominent Black newspapers, such as The Washington Tribune, The Afro American (with stories like “No Rear Door For Mitchell at Abe’s Tomb” and “To Attend White House Reception”), The Pittsburgh Courier (“Congressman Mitchell Fights Discrimination In The Civil Service”), The Second Ward Square Dealer of Chicago (“Millions Laud Congressman Mitchell For Great Act”) and The St. Louis Argus.  There are also pasted-in articles from more mainstream newspapers, such as The Birmingham News, Chicago World, The Birmingham Weekly Review (“Congressman Mitchell Defies Foes, Defends His ‘Pet’ Bill”), Time magazine, The Chicago Daily Times and others.  Also tipped in are ten separates from The Congressional Record (“Not Printed At Government Expense”, so the Congressman paid for these).  They record Mitchell speeches, mostly about lynch mobs but one on Booker T. Washington and another on “The Negro and the Democratic Party.”  There is a photograph of a Franklin D. Roosevelt signed letter to Mitchell.  There is also an illustrated political campaign broadside of Mitchell’s dating from mid 1930s against his opponent DePriest in which he denigrates DePriest for allowing black Gold Star Mothers to be sent overseas via a cattle boat to visit their sons graves.  As the scrapbook was ephemeral, the pages are brittle and loose from the original binding, although no pages are seemingly missing.  Some pages have various degrees of soiling.  One page uses two rusted paper clips.  Despite the condition issues, this scrapbook is historic; Mitchell’s election heralded the future many Blacks found in the Democratic Party, leaving behind the party of Lincoln.  It is also a family memento, indicating the pride that his sister felt for her accomplished brother.  $4,000.00
AUTOGRAPH DRAFT OF THE COMTE DE ROCHAMBEAU’S LETTER UPON ARRIVAL IN AMERICA TO ASSIST THE CONTINENTAL ARMY: “THE TROOPS UNDER MY COMMAND ARE FILLED WITH THE UTMOST ZEAL & THE MOST ARDENT DESIRE TO CONTRIBUTE TO THE GLORY & SUCCESS OF THE AMERICAN ARMS…THE SINCEREST REGARD FOR THE PEOPLE OF AMERICA”
 
JEAN-BAPTISTE DONATIEN DE VIMEUR, COMTE DE ROCHAMBEAU (1725-1807). Rochambeau was a French military leader who led the French forces aiding the Continental Army during the American Revolution.
 
AL. 1pg. N.d. [circa 1780]. N.p. An autograph draft letter by the Comte de Rochambeau, probably a retained copy. He wrote to an unidentified American official (perhaps General Washington) upon his arrival in America with about 5,000 French soldiers under his command to aid the Continental Army: “Sir, I received the letter which you were pleased to honor me with from Richmond, at the moment when I was about to inform you of my arrival in your Government. The troops under my command are filled with the utmost zeal & the most ardent desire to contribute to the Glory & success of the American Arms. Our ardour is augmented from the consideration that whatever survives we may have the happiness of rendering the American Cause will be agreeable to his most Christian Majesty our Master, who entertains the greatest affection, and the sincerest Regard for the people of America. Be pleased…to accept of my Assurances of the Desire I have of cultivating your Friendship which I earnestly solicit, and be convinced of these sentiments of respect with which I am your excellency’s most obedt & hble ser”. It is in very good condition with a small hole.  $2,500.00
BRITISH GENERAL WILLIAM PHILLIPS WRITES TO AN AMERICAN GENERAL WHILE A PRISONER WITH THE CONVENTION ARMY

WILLIAM PHILLIPS (1731-1781). Phillips was a British Army officer who served in the American Revolution. Phillips was part of the Convention Army of British and British-allied soldiers who became prisoners of war after General John Burgoyne’s surrender in 1777.
 
WILLIAM HEATH (1737-1814).  A Revolutionary War general from Massachusetts, Heath fought at Bunker Hill.  In January 1777, Heath, with 6,000 troops, so bungled the attack on Fort Independence in New York, garrisoned by 2,000 troops, that Washington reprimanded him.  He was placed in command of the Eastern district stationed in Boston.
 
LS. 1pg. April 22, 1778. Cambridge, [Massachusetts]. A letter signed W Phillips written while an American prisoner of war as part of the Convention Army. Phillips wrote to Continental Major General William Heath who was in charge of the Convention Army: “Sir Upon receiving your letter dated Yesterday I gave out the enclosed Orders, to which I have received the report herein sent you. The letters which are to go by the Flag of Truce over lake Champlain into Canada are all ready; as they are only Duplicates of those sent by Captain Willoe, I am to desire to know if you will have them sent into Boston for your own perusal, or whether your Depy. Adj.t General might not read them here, and I will request that the Officer who goes to Canada may set out as soon as conveniently may be, I am Sir, Your Humble Servant W Phillips. The letter and flag of truce that Phillips refers to probably relate to year-long diplomatic debate regarding the status of the Convention Army. It is in very good condition.  $2,250.00
CONNECTICUT FOUNDING FATHER ROGER SHERMAN WRITES AND SIGNS AN ESTATE DOCUMENT AS NEW MILFORD’S JUSTICE OF THE PEACE
 
ROGER SHERMAN (1721-1793). Sherman was a Founding Father and Senator from Connecticut. He was the only Founding Father to sign the Articles of Association, Declaration of Independence, Articles of Confederation, and Constitution.
 
ADS. 1pg. New Milford [Connecticut]. January 10, 1757. An autograph document signed Roger Sherman as Justice of the Peace, and also by two other men. Except for those two other signatures, the body of the document is entirely in Sherman’s hand. The document pertains to a New Milford estate. “Where as James Hays of New Milford was assessed four toto in the List of Chateable [sic] Estate for the year 1755 we the Subscribers having considered the circumstances of the case (two of the Listers being present) and we Judge it Reasonable that there be abated out of said List the sum of £49-10-0 and the same is hereby abated and we also abate out of the List of Gideon Nobles Estate in P. New Milford £12-0-0 fr the year 1755 Roger Sherman Justice of the Peace Peter Brownson Ames Northrup} Select men”. The document is extensively docketed by other hands on the verso. It is in very good condition with wear, tear, and minor losses but dark ink.  $950.00
ROBERT MORRIS TRIES TO SELL HIS ESTATE TO SETTLE HIS LATE-LIFE DEBTS
 
ROBERT MORRIS (1734-1806). Morris was a Founding Father from Pennsylvania. In addition to signing the Declaration of Independence, Articles of Confederation, and Constitution, he also helped to finance the Revolution.
 
ALS. 1pg. March 20, 1798. N.p. [probably Philadelphia]. An autograph letter signed Robt Morris. The letter concerns Morris’s late-life bankruptcy that landed him in debtors’ prison from 1798 to 1801. In fact, it’s possible that he wrote this letter from prison. He wrote to merchants Philip Nicklin and Robert Eaglesfield Griffith, inquiring about the possibility of selling his home on Chestnut Street in Philadelphia. The home, still unfinished, was demolished the following year: “Gentlm. I am arrived at a period when it is become essential to Messrs. Ball & Breede & Forde to have assistance from their claims on me, if you think there is any chance of an Agreement taking place for the Chestnut Street estate I should be glad of interview with one or both of you this forenoon, being Your most Obed hbl Servt Robt Morris. The letter is in very good condition with some wear and a loss to the bottom left corner.  $1,250.00
PRESIDENT TRUMAN WRITES TO RUTH BRYAN OWEN, AMERICA’S FIRST WOMAN AMBASSADOR: “I AM FAMILIAR WITH YOUR GREAT INTEREST IN THE UNITED NATIONS AND YOUR EFFORT TO INFORM THE AMERICAN PEOPLE ON THE NECESSITY FOR AN ASSOCIATION OF NATIONS FOR PEACE”
 
HARRY TRUMAN (1884-1972). Truman was the Thirty-Third President.
 
TLS. 1pg. 7” x 9”. October 5, 1949. The White House, Washington. A typed letter signed Harry S Truman as President on “The White House” stationery.  Truman wrote to Ruth Bryan (Owen) Rohde, the famous daughter of William Jennings Bryan: “I can’t tell you how very much I appreciated your good letter of September thirtieth.  I am familiar with your great interest in the United Nations and your effort to inform the American people on the necessity for an association of nations for peace.  I know you will do an excellent job.”  Owen was twice elected to the House of Representatives and was the first woman appointed as an ambassador when FDR, in 1933, sent her to Denmark and Iceland.  After World War II, she attended the San Francisco Conference that established the United Nations and, in 1948, President Truman made her an alternate delegate to the United Nations.  The letter is in very fine condition with a horizontal mailing fold.  $1,500.00
EXILED HUNGARIAN REVOLUTIONARY LAJOS KOSSUTH LAMENTS OTTOMAN VIOLENCE AGAINST HIS COUNTRYMEN
 
LAJOS KOSSUTH (1802-1894). Kossuth was a Hungarian nobleman, politician, and revolutionary.
 
ALS. 1pg. May 24, 1851. Kutahya, [Turkey]. An autograph letter signed L Kossuth. The former Governor-President of Hungary wrote from Turkey where he was in exile for his role in the failed Hungarian Revolution. He addressed Sir Stratford Canning, the British Ambassador in Constantinople, seeking assistance in dealing with Turkish violence against fellow Hungarian exiles: “Sir It is with the deepest sorrow I learn the violent measures of the Turkish Government, inflicted upon my poor exiled fellow countrymen at Constantinople. Being entirely at a loss what to think of this inexplicable sudden change in the politics of the Sublime Porte, as also in respect of the change in the Ministry: I beg leave to address myself to the wonted benevolence of your Excellency praying most humbly that you would be please to order that some exact information might be given to me about the meaning of those untoward events. With the most high esteeme [sic] and most particular consideration. Your Excellency’s obedient faithful servant L. Kossuth. “The Sublime Porte” refers to the Ottoman Empire’s central government.  Kossuth would shortly leave the Ottoman Empire, first visiting the United States and then the United Kingdom.  The letter is in fine condition.  $1,500.00
SPEAKING MY MIND SIGNED BY REAGAN
 
RONALD REAGAN (1911-2004).  Reagan was the Fortieth President.

SB. 432pg. No date. No place.  A first edition of Speaking My Mind signed Ronald Reaganon a bookplate attached to the first free endpage.  The book was published in 1989 by Simon and Schuster, and it is in the original dust jacket protected by a mylar sleeve.  The book is in near-fine condition with some pages remaining unopened.  There is a Ronald Reagan Library Gift Shop price tag still attached to the front dust jacket.  $750.00
A SIGNED PHOTO OF WESTERN ADVENTURE NOVELIST ZANE GREY ON HORSEBACK
 
ZANE GREY (1872-1939). Grey was an American author and dentist, best known for his Western adventure novels.
 
PS. 10 ½” x 6”. N.d. N.p. A black-and-white photograph signed “Yours truly Zane Grey. The photo depicts Grey riding a horse while dressed in old Western riding attire. The signature, in blue ink on the lower right side of the image, is a bit faint. It is in very good condition.  $400.00
A SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH OF VICHY LEADER PHILIPPE PÉTAIN ON HORSEBACK
 
HENRI PHILIPPE BENONI OMER PÉTAIN (1856-1951). Pétain was a Nazi collaborator and the leader of Vichy France.
 
PS. 5.5” x 3.5”. November 19, 1918. N.p.  A black-and-white postcard photograph signed Ph Pétain.  The image depicts Pétain on horseback in a military parade. It is in very good condition.  $400.00
GOVERNOR WILLIAM LIVINGSTON WRITES "TO THE COMMITTEE & MILITIA ON PUBLISHING THE DECLARATION OF INDEPEDENCY" ABOUT THE BRITISH ASSAULT ON CUMBERLAND COUNTY, NEW JERSEY
 
WILLIAM LIVINGSTON (1723-1790). Livingston was a Founding Father, Continental Congressman and Constitution Signer from New Jersey, and Governor of New Jersey.
 
ALS. 1pg. January 15, 1778. Morris Town [New Jersey]. An autograph letter signed Wm Livingston as Governor of New Jersey. In this Revolutionary War-dated letter, he mentions the ongoing British assault on southern New Jersey.  “There is no necessity for sending the two Men apprehended for plundering to the Council of Safety. If The Magistrates have committed them to the Jail in the County, they may be tried there at the next Court of Oyer & Terminer & General Gaol delivery. I shall give Colo. Ellis orders to spare a patrolling party in the County of Cumberland to defend it from the Depredations of the Enemy, & not to call any more of the militia out of that County than he thinks absolutely necessary – To be too particular in Instructions to a commanding officer may be of dangerous Consequence – I am Sir Your humble Srv Wm Livingston. The bottom edge of the letter is cut off, causing the bottom half of Livingston’s signature to be lost. The docket on the verso comes from an earlier letter concerning the Declaration of Independence – “Address to the Committee & Militia on Publishing the Declaration of Independency”. The document is in fair condition. In addition to the partial loss of the signature, there is a tear through the center of the document that has been repaired with tape on the verso.  $750.00
THE FIRST INDIAN HOME GUARD MOVES ON COXES CREEK, ARKANSAS
 
(FIRST INDIAN HOME GUARD). The First Indian Home Guard was a tri-racial Union Army Regiment made up of Native-Americans (mainly Creeks and Seminoles), African-Americans, and white officers.
 
DS. 1pg. September 13, 1862. N.p. An unusual Civil War document signed S. H. Wattes and Geo. W. Doblerand Lieutenant Colonel and First Lieutenant, respectively, of the First Indian Home Guard. Labelled “Order No15”, the document concerns movements of the First Indian Home Guard: “This Command will move in the direction of Coxes Creek [Arkansas] at Day light on the morning of Sept 17 1862. Care will be taken that nothing valuable be left in camp. By order of S. H. Wattes Lt. Col. Comdg Geo. W. Dobler 1st Lieut” It reads “Company ‘K’” on the verso. The First Regiment of Indian Home Guard was organized on May 22, 1862 in Le Roy, Kansas.  Colonel Wattles was a staunch Unionist and lived from 1824 to 1899.  It is in fine condition.  $750.00
CONTINENTAL ARMY SURGEON AND HARVARD MEDICAL SCHOOL FOUNDER DR. JOHN WARREN ADMITS A MEMBERS TO THE MASSACHUSETTS HUMANE SOCIETY
 
DR. JOHN WARREN (1753-1815). Warren was a Massachusetts surgeon who was a doctor for the Continental Army and founding professor of the Harvard Medical School. He was the younger brother of the better-known American Revolutionary Dr. Joseph Warren.
 
DS. 1pg. June 9, 1812. Boston, Massachusetts. A partially-printed document signed John Warren as President of the Massachusetts Humane Society and engrossed in another hand. This document admits a new member to the Humane Society; it was also signed by the group’s secretary: “Humane Society Instituted 1785 To all Persons to whom these Presents shall come, Greeting. The Trustees of the Humane Society (incorporated by a Law of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, passed in the year of our Lord 1791;) at a Meeting held in Boston, on the ninth Day of June one thousand eight hundred and twelve admitted Elisha Clap A:M: a [obscured] Society granting him all the rights of privileges thereunto belonging. In testimony whereof we have caused the Seal of the Society to be affixed to this certificate, and the same to be duly attested. Jha Davis Secretary John Warren President”. It is in fine condition with folds.  $750.00
HELEN KELLER SIGNS A PHOTOGRAPH TO A THIRD-GRADE CLASS
 
HELEN KELLER (1880-1968). Keller was a famous blind-deaf author and human rights advocate.
 
PS. 8” x 10”. April 1944. N.p. A black-and-white photograph signed Helen Keller. The image depicts Keller sitting on a sofa with a book in her lap, while a large dog rests at her feet. She wrote “To the Pupils Grade Three Hancock School with my love Helen Keller. The photo is in fine condition, but the pencil writing is difficult to read against the dark area where she signed.  $600.00
A HAWAIIAN TAX COLLECTOR MENTIONS PROMINENT HAWAIIAN SETTLERS IN A LETTER TO GOVERNOR JOHN EDWARD BUSH OF KAUA’I
 
(HAWAII).  ALS. 2pgs. October 2, 1877. Waimea, Kauai, Hawai’i. An autograph letter signed Abraham Palekaluhi Tax-Collector Waimea”. Palekaluhi wrote in the Hawaiian language to Governor John Edward Bush of Kaua’i. He mentions Elizabeth Sinclair, a Scottish immigrant who had purchased the whole island of Ni’ihau in 1864, as well as mentions McBride, possibly the United States Minister to Hawai’i James McBride, and Kauai sugar plantation owner Valdemar Knudsen. The letter is in very good condition, separating at the fold, and there is no translation available.  $750.00
A SIGNED PHOTO OF AUTHOR P.G. WODEHOUSE WITH HIS SENIOR DACHSHUND JED, PLUS ACCOMPANYING SIGNED LETTER
 
SIR PELHAM GRENVILLE WODEHOUSE (1881-1975). Wodehouse was a popular English comic author.
 
PS 3 ½” x 5 ½”. N.d. [1972]. N.d. [Remsenburg, NY]. A small, black-and-white photograph of P.G. Wodehouse with his dachshund, inscribed and signed “Best wishes P.G. Wodehouse on the top and bottom margins. The photograph, in fine condition, is accompanied by a typed letter with a small autograph correction, signed by Wodehouse. It is dated November 3, 1972 in Remsenburg, New York. “Dear Mr. Allen, Thank you so much for writing again. I am glad you like the picture I sent. The dog over my shoulder is our beloved Jed. He is quite a companion to my wife and myself. He, like myself is getting on in years; Jed being 15 years old. With all good wishes, Most sincerely, P.G. Wodehouse”. The letter is in fine condition with minor wear and a small piece of tape on the upper edge.  $250.00
A LETTER BY DAVID LEVY/YULEE, THE FIRST JEWISH-AMERICAN SENATOR
 
DAVID LEVY/YULEE (1810-1886). Yulee was a Jewish-American politician and Confederate from Florida. He was the first Jewish person to serve in the United States Senate.
 
ALS. 1pg. September 6, [before 1846]. N.p. An autograph letter signed D Levy. “If a packet arrives for me from Tallahassee directed in a manner recognized by…as the handwriting of his partner…the Port master at Washington will please allow him to take it. Respy D Levy”.  It is in very good condition with some discoloration and mounting remnants on the verso and smudging of the signature.  $250.00
THE FOUNDER OF THE ASPCA WRITES ABOUT LEGAL STRATEGIES: “THE CASE WHICH YOU SO KINDLY TOOK CHARGE OF FOR THE SOCIETY; BUT WHICH TERMINATED, I AM SORRY TO ADD, ADVERSELY FOR THE RACE OF DUMB CREATURES…WHEN THE ATROCIOUS BUTCHER CASES COME UP, I TRUST, THE RESULT WILL BE DIFFERENT – FOR THE ELEMENT OF HIS SUCCESS – RIDICULE – WILL BE WANTING”
 
HENRY BERGH.  Bergh was Lincoln’s Minister to Russia.  When he saw a master beating a horse in St. Petersburg, he resolved to protect animals.  When he returned to America, he founded the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in 1866.
 
ALS. 3pg. 6 ¼” x 8”. December 13, 1869. New York.  A lengthy autograph letter signed Henry Bergh on stationery with the ASPCA logo atop it.  He wrote to Mr. Bedford: “I feel that it is due to myself to say to you, that the case which you so kindly took charge of for the Society; but which terminated, I am sorry to add, adversely for the race of dumb creatures, we strove to protect today, was not brought into the Court of General Sessions through any act or desire of my own.  On the contrary, I caused it to be taken to the Special Sessions, but Mr. Spencer discovered a trifling error in the spelling of the defendants name, moved for a dismissal, which was granted, and on making a new complaint for reasons best known to himself, advised his clients to demand a jury trial.  I do not mean to understand as sharing the belief that some persons, that a goose is not entitled to protection – but, my experience has shown me, that the public – although great progress has been made – is not yet quite ready to accord to that despised animal, the consideration and justice they now extend to the horse; hence I preferred to try and effect the punishment of the offender, with less publicity.  I am familiar enough with the audiences not to have overlooked the absence of sympathy on the part of many present – and silently predicted the cheap and easy victory of the opposing counsel – the very name of goose being an argument in his favor, which of course he was aware of.  But, when the atrocious Butcher cases come up, I trust, the result will be different – for the element of his success – ridicule – will be wanting.  Two or three examples in your Court are wanting to deter malefactors from demanding ‘trial by jury’ and the sooner they are furnished, the better.  The annoyance which our failure to convict occasioned me, was greatly alleviated by the humane and encouraging remarks f our excellent and learned Recorder, and your great courtesy & sympathy with me in the difficult and arduous labor I am devoting my life to; will serve to stimulate to increased efforts…Henry Bergh. The letter has light mailing folds and is in fine condition.  $650.00
JOY ADAMSON ADVISES A COUPLE NOT TO NAME THEIR BABY AFTER HER
 
FRIEDERIKE VICTORIA “JOY” ADAMSON (1910-1980). Adamson was an Austrian naturalist, author, and wildlife conservationist. She is best known for Born Free, her book about her experiences raising an orphaned lion cub named Elsa, and its two sequels, Living Free and Forever Free.
 
TLS. 2pgs. November 30, 1974. London. A typed letter signed Joy Adamson on the facing page. Adamson wrote to a couple who was considering naming their newborn daughter after Adamson. “Dear Mr & Mrs Colbert, Thank you so much for your note and the photograph of your beautiful baby on whose birth I send you my most sincere congratulations. As to your suggestion to call the dear baby, Joy Adamson Colbert, I feel that this might jeopardise her own identity in future life, or that she might resent having to grow up in the image of another person. Although I am deeply touched by your kind consideration to name your little daughter after me, I believe that it would be more appropriate to call her Joy Elsa or perhaps Elsa Joy if you still wish to pursue the ideal of Elsa in her. With all very best wishes to you and the darling baby, Joy Adamson. Adamson’s letter is inside a notecard depicting Adamson’s painting of her lion club, Elsa, sleeping on a camp bed. It is in fine condition.  $200.00
A SIGNED PHOTO OF DALE CARNEGIE AND HIS DOG
 
DALE CARNEGIE (1888-1955). Carnegie was an American self-help expert who authored the classic How to Win Friends and Influence People.
 
PS. 5” x 7”. N.d. N.p. A black-and-white photograph inscribed and signed “To Herbert C. Semuel with deep salaams and salutations Dale Carnegie on the bottom margin. The photograph depicts Carnegie with his dog, a small terrier who stands on hind legs in response to Carnegie’s command. It is in fine condition.  $250.00
FIRST LADY ELEANOR ROOSEVELT MENTIONS FALA, THE ROOSEVELTS’ FAMOUS SCOTTIE DOG
 
ELEANOR ROOSEVELT (1884-1962). Roosevelt was First Lady from 1933 to 1945, as well as a prominent human rights activist.
 
TLS. 1pg. June 11, 1943. The White House. A typed letter signed Eleanor Roosevelt as First Lady. On “The White House” letterhead, Roosevelt discusses her famous Presidential dog, Fala the Scottish Terrier: “Dear Mrs. Tucker: Thank you for your letter. There have been so many things written about Falla [sic] and there is also a movie and I do not think there is anything I could add to the story of Falla [sic] and the Princesses. In any case, I will not be in New York City with any free time for the next several weeks. Very sincerely yours, Eleanor Roosevelt”. The movie Roosevelt refers to was produced by MGM about life in the White House. During his final Presidential campaign the following year, FDR would make a speech refuting claims that he had forgotten Fala in the Aleutian Islands and sent a destroyer to reclaim him, at taxpayer expense, saying that he felt justified in objecting to libel surrounding his dog. Fala is represented alongside FDR on his memorial in Washington D.C. It is in very good condition, with an area of toning.  $350.00
MARIA BALDWIN, ONE OF THE FIRST BLACK FEMALE PRINCIPALS OF A WHITE SCHOOL, RESPONDS TO AN INVITATION
 
MARIA BALDWIN (1856-1922). Baldwin was an African-American educator, one of the first African-American women to achieve professional success in a non-segregated school. She was the longtime principal of an Agassiz school in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where she oversaw mainly white faculty and students.
 
ALS. 1pg. October 30, 1915. Franklin Square House. An autograph letter signed Maria L. Baldwin: “Thank you for the guest card that has just come to me. I regret that I cannot reach you until about half past six, but I shall be there quite in time for the second part of your program. Sincerely yours, Maria L. Baldwin”.  It is in fine condition.  $750.00
THE GOVERNOR OF RHODE ISLAND WRITES TO THE GOVERNOR OF MASSACUSETTS ABOUT A FUGITIVE IN 1798
 
ARTHUR FENNER (1745-1805). Fenner was Governor of Rhode Island from 1790-1805.

LS. 2pgs. February 2, 1798. Providence, [Rhode Island]. A letter signed A Fenner as Governor of Rhode Island and written in another hand. Fenner wrote to Massachusetts Governor Increase Sumner concerning a fugitive. “Sir Application has been made to me according to the Constitution and Laws of the United States, to request your Excellency to cause to be apprehended a man of the mane of John Simmons a fugitive from the Justice of his State. I have the honour to forward herewith to your Excellency…and also a Warrant returned by an officer that the person charged is not to be found in his precinct. The man charged belongs to the town of Ne Bedford in your Commonwealth & is now resident there. I have therefore to request your Excellency immediately to take such steps as may be most expedient for the apprehending & securing the said John Simmons…I have the honour to be with great Respect your Excellencys most obedient & very humble servant. A Fenner. The letter is essentially an early example of an interstate fugitive warrant. It is in good condition, with a sizable tear on the inner margin, probably from the seal, that does not affect the text.  $400.00
DE WOLF HOPPER SIGNS A PHOTOGRAPH TO HIS YOUNG CO-STAR
 
WILLIAM DE WOLF HOPPER (1858-1935). Hopper was an American actor, singer, and comedian.
 
PS. 7.25” x 9.25”. 1924. N.p. [Washington D.C.] A black-and-white photograph inscribed and signed “To little Sweetie Aires with my best wishes De Wolf Hopper. Mary “Sweetie” Aires was one of Hopper’s young co-stars in the 1924 Washington D.C. production of the musical Wang. Hopper had premiered Wang in New York in 1891. The photo is attached to the inside front cover of a thin binder with a drawing of the Wang elephant on the cover. On the inside back cover is a signed photograph by another Hopper co-star. “To Sweetie Aires with best wishes from Ethel Clark. The pages in between contain press cuttings about Aires and the three other young co-stars of the Washington production. The Hopper photograph is in good condition with some tape and wear to the edges, especially the right edge that meets the binder’s spine.  $300.00
A REVOLUTIONARY WAR-ERA LETTER MENTIONING “MEXICAN DOLLARS” SENT TO JOHN BARRY
 
JOHN BARRY (1745-1803). Barry was an Irish-American Admiral who fought in the Revolutionary War. He is sometimes called the Father of the American Navy.
 
DS. 1pg. April 10, 1783. Philadelphia. A bill signed John Brown. In the final months of the American Revolution, Brown asked Captain John Barry to pay fifteen hundred “Mexican dollars” to a Nathaniel Barrett. This could refer to either Spanish or Mexican currency, as both were commonly used in America at this time. Spain also helped to finance the American Revolution. “Sir At sight of this my first bill seemed of same hour and date unpaid. Pay to Mr. Nathaniel Barrett or order Fifteen hundred Mexican Dollars and change…Sir your obed servant John Brown to John Barry Esq. Captain of the Frigate Alliance Providence Rhode Island”.  The Navy Board appointed Barry to command the Alliance in 1780.  At the time of this document, the Treaty of Paris had just been ratified but the accord was not yet well known; the Alliance was chased by a British ship.  On March 20, 1783, the Alliance docked at Newport and was safe from British molestation.  There are several signatures and dockets on the back, including one by Marc Lafitte, who may have been a notary (and may have also been married to the famous pirate Jean Lafitte). It is in very good condition with some toning.  $750.00
A REVOLUTIONARY WAR-DATED PARTIAL LETTER BY JOHN EUSTACE ABOUT FINANCIAL MATTERS, TO GENERAL LEE
 
JOHN SKEY EUSTACE (1760-1805). Eustace was an American soldier who served in the Continental Army during the American Revolution before spending six years in the French Army.
 
ALS. 3pgs. December 12, 1779. N.p. A partial autograph letter signed J. S. Eustace. During the American Revolution, Eustace wrote to a General Lee, possibly Charles Henry Lee (1732-1782), concerning financial matters. He also mentions General Horatio Gates (1727-1806): “that I expect the son of a bitch will challenge me w[hen] he comes to town. If he does he will find me as unconcern’d as he can possibly be anxious. Yesterday your two letters reach’d me in one of which you’ve fully gratified my inclination respecting the Sulking Mare and for which I am much obliged to you. I have had an interview with my unkle [sic] at Staten Island He treated me with extreme politeness – and urges to me the propriety of taking a trip with him to England I confess my own inclination tends strongly to a compliance with his proposition – but I shou’d first wish to have your assent – and sentiment thereon. Tis a ?? on which there is too much depending to be hastily undertaken – And I must beg you to write me. Little hourse permitted me to retain five and thirty hundred dollars in my hand, to make a purchase with – He call’d on me tother day for it - I told him I wou’d make sale of the articles I had bought and pay if to him in the course of a few days – He say’d he had not mention’d the matter to you and beg’d me to do it in the letter I was then writing and sending over by him – and the next day told me he had received a letter from you – purporting your instruction of drawing on him for it immediately – I pay’d him the money by disposing of a horse I have for sale … But I’m exceedingly angry at his desiring me to trouble you on the subject – when he himself with equal stupidity had wrote you before – for I told him at the time I got it – if you call on me at a time when I have not the money in my possession – I will remove that inconvenience by selling this horse immediately – This I did and the debt’s discharged. … Our worthy friend Genl Gates will fund you…yrs Eternally J.S. Eustace”. This partial letter is in fair condition – faded and worn, and extensively repaired with silking.  $350.00
IN THE LAST YEAR OF HIS LIFE, JUDGE LEARNED HAND MENTIONS PATENT LAW AND THE WORDS OF OLIVER WENDELL HOLMES
 
LEARNED HAND (1872-1961). Hand was an American lawyer and Federal judge.
 
TLS. 1pg. January 30, 1961. U.S. Court House, New York. A typed letter signed Learned Hand as Senior Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. On his official letterhead, Hand wrote about his judicial philosophy and a recent patent case. He mentions the words of Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. “Dear Mr. Toulmin: Thank you many times for your very kind words in your letter of January 23d. I cannot tell you how much it pleases me to have you speak of me as you do. I have always tried in patent, as in other litigation, to avoid any expression of my personal desires or feelings on the subject involved. I have never forgotten the words that Justice Holmes once said to me: ‘My business is not justice, but to play the game according to the rules.’ That you think that I have succeeded is the best reward that I can ask. I have no personal opinion as to the effect of our patent law upon the economy of the country. It is enough that it has been a steady undeviating factor in the policy of this country from the very beginning; and I think we should approach it with a completely detached emotional attitude. This I have tried to do, though I have found in a good many instances that it meets with anything but approval among the bar. I am glad to have your support. Sincerely yours, Learned Hand. Hand was involved in many patent cases, and the specific one referenced here is unclear. However, Hand was particularly influential in the area of patent law, which was of great interest to him. Hand died six months after writing this letter. It is in fine condition with light folds.  $250.00
A LEGAL DOCUMENT SIGNED BY SAMUEL OGLE AS BRITISH COLONIAL GOVERNOR OF MARYLAND
 
SAMUEL OGLE (c. 1694-1752). Ogle was Proprietary Governor of Maryland in the mid-18th century.
 
DS. 1pg. June 14, 1733. Maryland. A document signed Sam: Ogle as Proprietary Governor of Maryland: “…To the Sheriff of Queen Ann County Greeting We command you that the Several Acts of Assembly made the last Sessions at Annapolis the thirteenth day of March last herewith transmitted to you at your next County Court to publish in full Court hereof you are not to fail at your peril Witness Our Trusty and Well beloved Samuel Ogle Esq. Chan and Keeper of the Great Seal of Maryland this 14th day of June anno Dom 1733 Sam: Ogle. There are various other signatures as well. In good condition with general and losses to the edges, as well as minor toning and some ink splotches.  $400.00
GOVERNOR GENERAL OF CANADA ROBERT PRESCOTT AUTHORIZES A CLERK’S SALARY
 
ROBERT PRESCOTT (1725-1816). Prescott was a British civil servant and soldier in colonial North America. He was General and Commander in Chief of His Majesty’s Forces in North America and Governor of Canada. He also fought in the American Revolution.
 
DS. 1pg. May 26, 1797. Quebec. A partially-printed document signed Robt Prescottas Governor General of the Canadas and engrossed in another hand. He orders a clerk to be paid. “ROBERT PRESCOTT, ESQUIRE, Governor of the Province of Lower-Canada, General and Commander in Chief of His Majesty’s Forces in North America, &c. &c. &c. To Henry Caldwell, Esq; Receiver-General. You are hereby directed and required, out of such Monies as are or shall come to your hands for defraying the Expenses of the Civil Government of this Province, to pay or cause to be paid unto The Honorable Hugh Finlay Esquire or to his Assigns, the Sum of Four hundred and ninety three pounds thirteen shillings & eleven pence Sterling, being for 4 Years and 342 days Salary as Clerk of the Crown in Chancery from the 24th day of May 1792 to the 30th of April 1797 inclusive at the rate of one hundred pounds sterling p Annum pursuant to a Letter from His Grace the Duke of Portland dated 20th January 1797. And for your so doing this, with the Acquittance of said Hugh Finlay or his Assigns, shall be your sufficient Warrant and Discharge…Robt Prescott. It is in very good condition, with mounting remnants on the verso; one has caused a small in the lower left corner.  $300.00
GOVERNOR BLOOMFIELD OF NEW JERSEY APPOINTS A JUDGE
 
JOSEPH BLOOMFIELD (1753-1823). Bloomfield was Governor of New Jersey and Congressman from New Jersey.
 
DS. 1pg. November 23, 1808. Trenton, New Jersey. A partially-printed document signed Joseph Bloomfield as Governor of New Jersey and engrossed in another hand. Bloomfield appointed a judge in Burlington County. “To Ebenezer Tucker Esquire GREETING: THE COUNCIL and ASSEMBLY, reposing special trust and confidence in your integrity prudence and ability, have at a JOINT-MEETING, appointed you the said Ebenezer Tucker to be one of the Judges of the Inferior Court of Common Pleas, in and for the county of Burlington. You are therefore by these presents commissioned one of the Judges of the said Inferior Court of Common Pleas, to be holden in and for the said country of Burlington TO HAVE AND TO HOLD the same, with all powers and jurisdictions, cognizable in the said Court, and before a Judge of the Inferior Court of Common Pleas to severally and jointly in the said county, with other the Judges of the said state; together with the fees allowed for the exercise of the several duties thereof, agreeably to the Constitution and Laws of the said state; In Testimony Whereof the Great Seal of the said state is hereunto affixed: Witness Joseph Bloomfield Governor of the state of New Jersey, at Trenton, the twenty third day of November in the year of our LORD eighteen hundred and eight. Joseph Bloomfield”. The document was also signed James Linn as New Jersey Secretary of State and sealed with the State Seal. A handwritten docket on the verso, dated December 13, 1808 and signed by another man, records that Tucker assumed the judgeship he was appointed to. It is in good condition with repairs to the vertical fold on the verso.  $250.00
A SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH OF REX BEACH WITH DOGS
 
REX BEACH (1877-1949). Beach was an American writer and Olympic water polo player.
 
PS. 7” x 9”. N.d. N.p. A sepia photograph of Rex Beach with three dogs, signed Rex Beach.  It is in fine condition.  $150.00
A PHOTOGRAPH SIGNED BY ELLEN TERRY AND DOG
 
ELLEN TERRY (1847-1928). Terry was a celebrated British stage actress.
 
PS. 3 ½” x 5 ½”. N.d. N.p. A postcard photograph signed “Bruin & Ellen Terry. The black-and-white image depicts Terry holding a white dog. Terry’s fondness for dogs is well documented.  It is in fine condition.  $150.00
A SMALL SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH OF DAPHNE DU MAURIER WITH HER DOG
 
DAME DAPHNE DU MAURIER (1907-1989). Du Maurier was an English author.
 
PS. 3 ½”  x 2 ½”. N.p. N.d. A small photograph of Daphne du Maurier with her dog, signed “yours sincerely Daphne du Maurier. The photograph is a bit blurry and it is signed in blue ink.  It is in very good condition.  
$125.00
A SIGNED PHOTOGRAPH OF GERALDINE FARRAR AND HER DACHSHUNDS
 
GERALDINE FARRAR (1882-1967). Farrar was an American opera singer and movie actress.
 
PS. 5 ½” x 3 ½”. 1949. N.p. A small, black-and-white photograph signed Ga Farrar 1949”.  She is shown holding two dachshunds,. In fine condition, though the photo is a bit grainy.  $150.00
FITZ-GREENE HALLECK COPIES OUT AND SIGNS TWO VERSES BY THOMAS CAMPBELL

FITZ-GREENE HALLECK (1790-1867). Halleck was an American poet and member of the Knickerbocker Group.
 
AQS. 1pg. January 13, 1838. N.p. An autograph quote signed Fitz-Greene Halleck. Halleck wrote out two verses of Thomas Campbell’s poem “Hallowed Ground”. “What hallows ground where heroes sleep? 'Tis not the sculptured piles you heap; In dews that heavens far distant weep Their turf may bloom, Or Genii twine beneath the deep Their coral tomb, But strew his ashes to the wind Whose sword or voice has served mankind,- And is he dead, whose glorious mind Lifts thine on high? To live in hearts we leave behind Is not to die. (Campbell) Fitz-Greene Halleck 13th Jany ‘38”. It is in very good condition with some toning. There is another poem, written and signed in another hand, on the verso.  $250.00
DIOSDADO MACAPAGAL THANKS AMBASSADOR WILLIAM BLAIR FOR HIS TIME IN THE PHILIPPINES
 
DIOSDADO MACAPAGAL (1910-1997). Macapagal was President of the Philippines from 1961 to 1965.
 
WILLIAM McCORMICK BLAIR, JR. (1916-2015). Blair was U.S. Ambassador to Denmark and the Philippines.
 
LS. 1pg. September 29, 1967. 92 Cambridge Circle, Makati, Rizal, Philippines. A letter signed “Diosdado Macapagal” as former President of the Philippines and written on his letterhead in another hand. As William Blair prepared to leave his post as U.S. Ambassador to the Philippines, Macapagal sent him this warm letter thanking him for his stay. “Dear Ambassador Blair: Ms. Macapagal and I thank you beyond words can express for having us at The delightful dinner at The Embassy the other night. It was particularly memorable for us since it was on the eve of my birthday. When you end your unprecedentedly long tour of duty in the Philippines, you are entitled to the satisfaction that you not only accomplished well – as well as the most successful of your predecessors – the mission of riveting Philippine-American friendship, understanding and mutual collaboration but that you have blazed a trail of prudent forthrightness which will do good to both people now and in the years to come. Mrs. Macapagal and I agree that, in addition, you and Mrs. Blair will have left an imprint of charm and elegance which made your service in our country a privilege for our people. We will follow with keen interest your activities henceforth with a constant wish that you shall meet with continued success which you both so eminently deserve. Thank you again, Sincerely yours, Diosdado Macapagal”. In very good condition, with a very small tear in the upper edge.  $250.00
CONTEMPORARY COPY OF A BARON VON STEUBEN LETTER ABOUT CONTINENTAL TROOP MOVEMENTS NEAR RICHMOND
 
BARON FRIEDRICH WILHELM VON STEUBEN (1730-1794). Von Steuben was a Prussian military officer who helped to reform and train the Continental Army during the American Revolution.
 
Contemporary copy. 1pg. April 23, 1781. Petersburg, Virginia. A contemporary copy of a war-dated letter by Baron von Steuben, concerning Continental Army movements during the American Revolution. “The commanding officer of the militia now collected at Richmond will march with half of those that are armed to the long bridge on Chickahominy, and he will order the other half under the command of the rest officer in command to Turkey Island, those two officers will correspond with each other advise Col. James of their arrival and receive his orders. From the past at the long bridge patrols must be frequently sent to Joans’s bridge and from Turkey Island to Kennons and the road leading to Chickahominy River in order to be appraised of any motion of the enemy, which must be communicated from one post to the other. Steuben Maj. Genl. (a copy)”. In April of 1781, British forces were attempting to retake Virginia for the final time. This contemporary copy is very good condition.  $500.00
ADVERTISEMENT FOR A SUTRO BATHS SWIMMING RACE FEATURING AUSTRALIAN CHAMPION CHARLES CAVILL
 
(SUTRO BATHS). Located in San Francisco, Sutro Baths was the largest indoor swimming venue in the world when it opened in March 1896. It was owned by San Francisco mayor Adolph Sutro (1830-1898). Sutro Baths burned to the ground in 1966.
 
An advertisement for an August 30, 1896 swimming tournament at the newly-opened Sutro Baths in San Francisco. The headliner of the event was Charles Cavill (1870-1897), a member of the noted Australian Cavill family of champion swimmers. This was Cavill’s first American appearance; he would drown in California the following year. Prominent American swimmers were also featured. The poster is in good condition with several water stains and chipping to the margins.  $400.00
THE AMERICAN LEGATION WARNS AMERICANS IN PEKING JUST AFTER THE CHINESE REVOLUTION OF 1911

(CHINA). Letter. 1pg. March 7, 1912. Peking. A typed circular sent to American residing in Peking, China. It was written in the wake of the 1911 Chinese Revolution that overthrew the Qing Dynasty and ended imperial rule: “To the American Residents of Peking Not in the Legation Quarter and not Connected with the various Missions. The American Legation is of the opinion that the Americans resident in Peking should remain for the present either in the Legation Quarter or at some one of the Mission premises now under the protection of an American military guard. Having been informed of this opinion the individuals concerned must assume the responsibility of deciding as to the possibility or advisability of their own conformity therewith. In any case the Legation should be kept constantly informed of the place of residents of each American, in order that, where possible, assistance may be rendered in the event of a recurrence of special danger. The American Legation requests cooperation in the dissemination of the purport of this Circular.” In very good condition, written on thin onionskin paper, with some wrinkles and a mark in the upper left.  $300.00
AN ANONYMOUS DIATRIBE AGAINST DANIEL WEBSTER, REGARDING THE EMBARGO ACT OF 1807
 
(EMBARGO ACT OF 1807). The Embargo Act of 1807 limited foreign trade with the United States. It was intended to stop France and England from repeatedly interfering with American maritime activity, pressing American sailors into British military service, and trying to embroil the United States in the Napoleonic Wars. The act was controversial and unsuccessful.
 
Manuscript. 1pg. N.d. [1808] N.p. A handwritten manuscript ridiculing Daniel Webster for his words against the Embargo Act of 1807 at the very beginning of his political career: “On the author of the federal pamphlet entitled ‘considerations on the Embargo laws’ He is one to whom Heaven has denied the gift of brains, and has suffered the Devil to fill the empty spaces in his skull with a share of glaring imprudence called wit, and will pass for such among those who have none, and for the worst of folly among the rest of Mankind. REPUBLICANS”. President Thomas Jefferson, who had encouraged Congress to pass the Embargo Act, was a Democrat-Republican, while Webster was a Federalist. This anonymous diatribe is in fine condition.  $200.00
A HERMAN WOUK SIGNED PHOTO WITH HIS GERMAN SHEPHERD
 
HERMAN WOUK (1915-2019). Wouk was a Pulitzer-Prize winning American writer, best known for The Caine Mutiny.
 
PS. 3 ½” x 5”. N.d. N.p. A small, black-and-white photograph of Herman Wouk with his German shepherd, signed "Herman Wouk". In fine condition.  $150.00
DEAN RUSK SIGNS A PHOTO TO AMBASSADOR WILLIAM BLAIR
 
DEAN RUSK (1909-1994). Rusk was Secretary of State under Kennedy and Johnson.
 
WILLIAM McCORMICK BLAIR, JR. (1916-2015). Blair was Ambassador to Denmark and the Philippines.
 
PS. 7 3/4” x 9 7/8”. N.d. N.p. A black-and-white photograph inscribed and signed “With high esteem and appreciation for my friend and colleague Bill Blair Dean Rusk on the wide bottom margin. Rusk was Secretary of State during both of Blair’s Ambassadorial appointments. It is in very good condition, the photograph is slightly curled and has mounting remnants on the verso.  $150.00
THE SIGNATURE OF IRISH REPUBLICAN JOHN BOYLE O’REILLY
 
JOHN BOYLE O’REILLY (1844-1890). O’Reilly was a writer, Irish freedom activist, and Irish Republican Brotherhood member (Fenian) who was sent to the British penal colony in Australia and then escaped to the United States.
 
ANS. 1pg. November 23, 1878. N.p. An autograph note signed “To Mrs. Wm. A. Horey with the Kindest regards of John Boyle O’Reilly 24th Nov. 1878”. It is in fair condition, with a sizable water stain on the right and bottom edges of the large page that does not affect the writing.  $100.00
 
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