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(Mi)^2 Update May 2017
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In This Issue:

Call for Proposals: Making Mathematics Meaningful Through Collaboration


The third annual joint effort from the Michigan Council for Exceptional Children, Michigan Council for Teachers of Mathematics, and Michigan’s Integrated Mathematics Initiative will be held at Lansing Community College on October 23.

This event brings together math educators interested in learning more about how to teach mathematics to students with disabilities.

The committee seeks proposals for one-hour breakout sessions in the afternoon that address these topics:
  • Instructional strategies
  • Collaboration structures
  • Behavior management
  • Technology integration
  • Engagement techniques
  • Co-teaching models
  • Tier 2 intervention
  • Students with special needs in general education settings

Proposals can be submitted on the MICTM site through May 26.

Math Offerings at Alt+Shift Summer Institute: Rethink Possibilities


The 2017 Alt+Shift Summer Institute will be held June 20–22 at the Hagerty Center in Traverse City. Summer Institute registration is now open. Download the Summer Institute program for information on sessions and speakers.

The format for the institute includes one day of TED-style talks and corresponding breakout sessions followed by two-day intensive institutes.

Math offerings include:

Math Instruction That Works (TED-style talk and breakout session) Participants will walk away with different strategies and materials for working with a variety of students in a high school math class, regardless of ability level. Participants will also learn types of differentiation, including creating multiple versions of activities, hands-on learning, how to use a second set of hands in the classroom, and reaching many different types of learners within one room. The greatest differentiation strategy of all—CHOICE—will be a big feature.

Foundations of Math: Teaching Students With Significant Disabilities Two-Day Preview (two-day institute)
This two-day preview of a new five-day learning opportunity coming to Michigan will present material from the full course. Foundations of Math: Teaching Students With Significant Disabilities was developed as a research-based model that forms the groundwork for success in mathematics for students with significant disabilities. Participants will gain an understanding of:
  • The structure of the course.
  • Research in mathematics for students with significant disabilities.
  • How we assess students to promote achievement.
  • The Components of Number Sense.
  • The importance of teacher knowledge as it relates to student understanding.
Participants will increase their own content knowledge of mathematics while learning implications for instruction for this population of students.

If you have already attended Foundations of Math trainings, you will find that the information regarding the Components of Number Sense is the same between the two courses. For most people who go through this training more than once, they find having a second exposure to the information helpful. Information on research and assessment, and the accompanying discussions, will be unique to this version of the training.

Powering English Language Arts and Mathematics Standards for Every Student
The first question that any Professional Learning Community (PLC) must answer is, “What do we want our students to know and be able to do?” To answer that question, a collaborative team must identify power, or essential, standards. By definition, “power or essential standards are the standards a team believes all students must possess for either deep understanding or the ability to perform” (Bailey, 2014). Ultimately, these standards will receive the most emphasis in both core instruction and tier 2 interventions, serve as the foundation for standards-based grading, and guide decisions around formative and summative assessment.

How does a team comprising both general education and special education teachers go about powering standards? Often, this work is done outside of special education. However, this is a critical conversation for all stakeholders. Over the course of the past two school years, K–5 teachers in Berrien County have engaged in the process of identifying their power standards in mathematics and language arts. In this two-day institute, participants will investigate resources and protocols used to prioritize standards so that they might engage in a similar process with their own collaborative teams.

On day one, participants will review the rationale behind powering and begin the process around English Language Arts standards. On day two, participants will continue this process for mathematics, and also examine the role of the Standards for Mathematical Practice and growth mindset in the mathematics classroom. The hope is that both special education and general education will feel empowered to make intentional decision regarding “What do we want all kids to know and be able to do?”

Information, including registration, session descriptions, and hotel information, are available at the (Mi)2 website.

Foundations of Math


There are three upcoming opportunities for Foundations of Math. Registration is open for all three.

Foundations of Math: Teaching Students With Significant Disabilities Two-Day Preview is offered as part of the Alt+Shift Summer Institute on June 21 and 22 in Traverse City. This two-day preview of a new five-day learning opportunity coming to Michigan will present material from the full course. Foundations of Math: Teaching Students With Significant Disabilities was developed as a research-based model that forms the groundwork for success in mathematics for students with significant disabilities. Participants will gain an understanding of:
  • The structure of the course.
  • Research in mathematics for students with significant disabilities.
  • How we assess students to promote achievement.
  • The Components of Number Sense.
  • The importance of teacher knowledge as it relates to student understanding.
Participants will increase their own content knowledge of mathematics while learning implications for instruction for this population of students. Register for the Alt+Shift Summer Institute and choose this as your two-day institute option.

Foundations of Math will be offered in St. Johns August 7–8, October 16, and November 8–9. Dr. Chris Cain will instruct this five-day research-based training course for all educators of K–12 students who struggle with mathematics, including and especially those with an individualized education program (IEP). The course is designed to develop educators’ knowledge of the mathematics they teach by seeing it through the lens of a well-delineated number sense. Participants will:
  • Build deep foundational content and pedagogical knowledge.
  • Learn how to make solid instructional choices that positively impact students.
  • Connect procedures used in mathematics to conceptual understanding.
  • Build mathematical understanding and accurately assess learning for a range of learners.
Online Foundations of Math registration is now open.

Foundations of Math: Teaching Students With Significant Disabilities will be offered in St. Johns August 9–10, October 17–18, and November 10. Dr. Chris Cain will instruct this five-day research-based training course for teachers of students with significant disabilities. Like Foundations of Math, the course is designed to develop educators’ knowledge of the mathematics they teach by seeing it through the lens of a well-delineated number sense. This course focuses on research and practice that addresses the unique instructional challenges of teaching mathematics to students with significant disabilities, and provides teachers with the mathematical understanding needed to provide coherent, consistent mathematics instruction.

Online Foundations of Math: Teaching Students With Significant Disabilities registration is now open.

Enhancing Mathematics Instruction for Students With Disabilities: Implementation Story


Gregory & MichaelEducators: Gregory J. White and Michael A. Corridor
Positions: Mr. White is a 7th and 8th grade middle school math teacher. Mr. Corridor is a 6th, 7th, and 8th grade middle school special education teacher.
Building and District: Royal Oak Middle School, Royal Oak School District

Mr. Corridor and Mr. White attended Enhancing Mathematics training together in Oakland County. They discuss below how their implementation of the course is going. The teachers drew on ideas in the course based in Universal Design for Learning to teach their unit on Expressions and Equations.

Corridor: Greg, I have really enjoyed watching students who typically struggle with math computation work on figuring out visual patterns.

White: We have been focusing on those students who struggle with the procedures and algorithms and have been focusing a little more on the thinking and how you figure out the patterns, often asking them to identify what’s changing from one step to the next.

Corridor: Greg, I know we both have been discussing and working on making the shift to student-centered instruction. I was wondering, how is it coming along?

White: It’s going well. However, it is a difficult shift for a lot of students because they are so comfortable looking up at the teacher, who is sharing knowledge with them, and taking notes. Since I have transitioned to student-centered instruction, I am trying to get students to interact more. The goal is to get students to engage with each other and the concepts that we are talking about. I want them to start asking questions and sharing what they know and what ideas they have about those different concepts instead of just sitting quietly and taking notes. It is a shift for kids, and it takes them out of their comfort zone. But once I get some kids together, they get more comfortable and it starts to become a classroom norm.

Corridor: One of the things I really liked about Enhancing Mathematics was the instructional strategy of using visual patterns and visible thinking routines to better understand linear equations. I have been using figure zero when analyzing visual patterns. It has enhanced instruction, and my students really enjoyed figuring out and drawing how the patterns began. One of the major concepts that my students struggled with was they always assumed that all patterns begin at zero and should all be graphed by using the ordered pair (0,0). Therefore, they often were confused when they had to graph linear equations on the coordinate plane. Teaching the students how to go back to figure zero really had a huge impact on how quickly my students were able to master the concept of writing equations in slope-intercept form. It was also helpful to have the students describe the patterns using written language as well as drawings.

White: I have noticed the same thing with many of my students. Students see figure zero as “step zero,” or the beginning point, so they assume it must be always be zero. However, once they do it multiple times and they can work the pattern backward using their rate to go in reverse order, it becomes kind of like second nature to them.

Corridor: The whole idea of visual patterns really motivated us to start thinking about other creative ways to teach students. I believe that other teachers may find these strategies as helpful as we have. Using these activities to teach students who are easily distractible has helped me increase engagement. It has really helped me to break up instruction. My students have more opportunities to think and do not have to listen to long lectures. It really helps to keep the class moving. However, the most powerful thing about these strategies is when kids start to make the connections between the math and the activities.

The strategies are below:

Math Twitter Blogosphere
Estimation 180
Fawn Nguyen’s blog
Weigh the Wangdoodles
Math Playground
Global Math Department

Corridor: Giving students different ways to explore and view equations and systems of equations is not just fun, but also meaningful. It makes the math concrete and easier for students to relate to. This reminded me of a strategy I used in which I used picture books as an entry point to teaching students linear equations (The Twelve Days of Kindergarten by Deborah Lee Rose and Counting Sheep by Julie Glass).

White: Making math accessible to all students has helped shape students who are less dependent on me for answers. It goes back to the idea of student-centered instruction. The teacher is talking less so there is more time for inquiry and students engaging with their peers.

Delta Math


The Ottawa Area Intermediate School District (ISD), with the support of Michigan’s Integrated Mathematics Initiative, (MI)2, provides implementation support for schools using Delta Math to identify and support students who struggle. Implementation support for the 2017–2018 school year will include the following options:
  • Implementation training for schools new to Delta Math, newly hired staff from schools currently using Delta Math, and “veteran” instructional leaders are welcome to join us for a refresher opportunity!
  • Data review and implementation planning for leadership teams to explore local data and share action plans to increase local capacity by learning from other teams.
  • Tier 2 instructional support for math interventionists and/or teacher leaders to explore the evidence-based structure of the Delta Math tier 2 intervention lessons, including topic-specific visual representations and math strategies.
If you would like to learn more about Delta Math or schedule implementation support for your school or district, please contact Mike Klavon at mklavon@oaisd.org.

The More Things Change, The More They Stay the Same


If you have not stumbled upon Graham Fletcher’s blog, GFletchy, you should. In “Conservation: The more things change, the more they stay the same,” Mr. Fletcher describes a lesson he did with kindergartners and 1st graders linking conservation to the concept of decomposing and unitizing (which some would call composing).  He suggests that understanding conservation (things can change, yet maintain certain properties, such as flattening a ball of clay may change its form, but does not change its weight) is linked to concepts of decomposing and unitizing (ten units composed as one ten—new form, same value). For students to understand alternate forms of numbers, they need the underlying idea that things can be different in some ways but still the same in others. Follow his series of short videos, interspersed with succinct explanation, as he builds his argument.

Upcoming (Mi)2 Professional Learning Opportunities

Math Around Michigan


Moore Mathematics Competition
Albion College’s second annual Moore Mathematics Competition will be held on Friday, May 12. In this competition, teams of four 9th and 10th grade students work on one individual event and three team events, which generally involve material from algebra and geometry. They also provide an opportunity to explore some areas of mathematics that are not in the standard curriculum. New this year in the competition will be a mathematical build where teams will create a mathematical sculpture to take back to their classroom. Each team must be accompanied by a teacher/coach who serves as a proctor throughout the day. There is no charge for participants. For more information and to register, visit the Moore Math Marathon website.

Macomb ISD Summer Professional Learning Opportunities
Macomb ISD has a variety of offerings for all grade levels from June to August. Topics include proportional relationships, number talks, fractions/decimals/percents, Math Recovery, and the National Council for Teachers of Mathematics’ Principles to Action. For a list of offerings, including dates, registration, and cost, check out the Mathematics Summer Workshops flyer.

Teaching With Spatial Technology
The Michigan Society of Professional Surveyors is sponsoring a free weeklong professional development opportunity for Michigan grade 9–12 teachers. Teaching with Spatial Technology (TWIST) is designed to provide grade 9–12 teachers with meaningful and challenging lesson plans about using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Global Positioning Systems (GPS) in the classroom. The workshop, which will be held June 25–30 at Michigan Technological University in Houghton, is intended to provide participants basic proficiencies about some of the many aspects of spatial technology which is growing in importance in this global environment. Have a question? Email event coordinator Karol Grove.

AP® Computer Science Principles (CSP) Professional Learning Series
The Michigan Math and Science Center Network is offering the AP® CSP Professional Learning series this summer for schools offering AP® Computer Science next fall. Interested schools will submit an application to attend the five-day conference-style workshop designed to introduce the computer science concepts from the curriculum, AP® elements of the course, and core teaching practices. The series runs from July 31 to August 4, 2017. For more information, including the application for participation, visit the CSP Professional Learning Series website.

Save the Date: Michigan Council of Teachers of Mathematics (MCTM) Annual Conference
The 68th MCTM Annual Conference will be held July 25–27 at Traverse City Central High School. Keynote speakers include Margaret Heritage, speaking on formative assessment, and Jason Zima, a lead writer of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics. Keep an eye on the MCTM website for registration announcements.

Save the Date: Detroit Area Council of Teachers of Mathematics (DACTM) and Metro Detroit Science Teachers Association Joint Annual Conference
The joint conference will be held in Warren at Cousino High School on Saturday, November 11, 2017. Keep an eye on the DACTM website for details as they become available.

(Mi)2 Partner Organizations

 

Detroit Area Council of Teachers of Mathematics (DACTM)

Detroit Area Council of Teachers of Mathematics logo
The Detroit Area Council of Teachers of Mathematics (DACTM) proactively supports Michigan math educators’ continued professional growth.
 

Michigan Council for Exceptional Children (MCEC)

logo for Michigan Council of Teachers of Mathematics
The Michigan Council for Exceptional Children (MCEC) is part of a national community of educators who are the voice and vision of special and gifted education.
 

Michigan Council of Teachers of Mathematics (MCTM)

logo for Michigan Council of Teachers of Mathematics
The Michigan Council of Teachers of Mathematics (MCTM) is the professional organization for Michigan mathematics educators at any grade level, pre-K through college.

 

Michigan Math and Science Center Network (MMSCN)

Michigan Math and Science Center Network logo
The Michigan Mathematics and Science Centers Network (MMSCN) collaborates with partners across the state to improve math and science teaching.

Alt+Shift, encompassing Michigan's Integrated Mathematics Initiative, is an Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Grant Funded Initiative out of the Michigan Department of Education, Office of Special Education.
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