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February 5, 2021 OSHER LIFELONG LEARNING INSTITUTE
 
The Equal Opportunity Registration Period for Study and Shared Interests Groups has closed. Winter/Spring 2020-21 registration continues for courses that are not oversubscribed. 
 
Click the image below to view the PDF of the OLLI Winter/Spring catalog to register. 
Finding Zoom Meeting IDs and Links: 
  • Zoom information is sent out in e-mail a few days before the event takes place.
  • Zoom information is also available in OLLI's online Course Catalog for events for which you have registered as well as for events that are free or do not require registration. The Zoom information is added to the Course Catalog a few days before the event takes place. To view the information in the Course Catalog (i) sign in using your OLLI account and password, (ii) go to the Course Catalog, (iii) locate your event and click on it to see the event's details, (iv) you'll find the Zoom information under Location toward the bottom of the page (you may need to scroll down to find it, if the event's description is long).
  • If you are signed in you can also see Zoom information on the payment History web page. 
  • If you can't find the information you need to connect using Zoom or you have any other questions about using Zoom, send e-mail to OLLI at olli.info@umich.edu or call 734-998-9351

    Important OLLI Web Resources –
    Click on the links below to connect you!

     
    OLLI Website 
    Donate to OLLI
    OLLI Video Catalog  
    OLLI Calendar
    All Things 2020 Kickoff
    OLLI Commons Calendar
Are You Looking for Volunteer Opportunities at OLLI?
 

Join The Lectures Committee to meet new people while creating Thursday morning lectures.  We are looking for new members to join one of the following committees:
Great Lakes Native Americans
Global Waters
Nature in Southeast Michigan
Social Safety Nets and Public Finance 
Contact Frances Schultz @ A2Fran@SBCglobal.net  for more information.

OLLI Reads Presents: Black Bottom Saints…by Alice Randall

Monday, February 8th, 10:00 – 12:00 pm. Online. $10
  

Join Alice Randall for a discussion of her magical novel "Black Bottom Saints” which brings to life Detroit’s Black Bottom neighborhood, one of the most influential, artful Black communities in America.

Alice Randall’s novel brings to life Detroit’s legendary neighborhood, one of the most influential, artful Black communities in America. The novel, reminiscent of E.L. Doctorov’s Ragtime, comes alive through the voice of Joseph “Zig-gy” Johnson (1913-1968) who was a real-life nightclub impresario, dance studio instructor, and entertainment columnist for the Michigan Chronicle.

It takes its shape from the Catholic Saints Day Books with Ziggy choosing his own “52 Saints.” Randall balances the stories of these larger-than-life “Saints” (Dina Washington, Joe Louis, and Sammy Davis, Jr.) with local heroes (Charles Diggs, UAW negotiator Marc Stepp, and Maxine Powell), and creates enthralling characters whose unstoppable ambition, love of style, and faith in community made this black Midwestern neighborhood the rival of New York City’s Harlem.

Alice Randall was born in Detroit and raised in Washington DC. She is a Harvard-educated author of novels, including The Wind Done Gone, Pushkin and the Queen of Spades, Rebel Yell, and Ada’s Rules. She is also the first African American woman to write a #1 Country and Western song (XXX’s and OOO’s which celebrates Aretha Franklin). With her daughter, Caroline Randall Williams, she co-authored the acclaimed cookbook Soul Food Love which won the NAACP Image award and the young adult novel The Diary of B. B. Bright, Possible Princess, which received the Phillis Wheatley Award.
 
Alice Randall is a Professor and Writer-in-Residence at Vanderbilt University.

To Register: Visit OLLI’s Website Course Catalog. Sign in at www.olli-umich.org.


OLLI's Special Projects Presents…
Torn from the Headlines—Check out our February Topic! 


OLLI Torn from the Headlines series presents its February topic and speaker! This monthly series goes behind the headlines with a two-part program each month.  Hear first from an expert on the topic with an opportunity for an extended Q and A.  On the day following the session, join a continued facilitated discussion in the Commons.  Registration now open--$55 for the series (monthly January-June) or $10 per individual session.  Future topics and speakers to be announced based on current happenings.

New Muslim Alliances with Israel and their Impact on the Middle East

Why has the Trump Administration vigorously pursued normalized relations between Israel and Muslim states - that long have been aligned with the cause of the Palestinians – in recent months?  In December, Morocco joined Bahrain, Sudan, and the United Arab Emirates in the Abraham Accords: agreements to set aside generations of hostilities toward Israel over the Palestinian conflict as part of a campaign to stabilize the Middle East and North Africa.  What are the key goals for Mr. Trump and Mr. Netanyahu, and what are the implications for the U.S.’s foreign policy in the Biden Administration? What other countries could suffer adverse consequences?  What is the likelihood that Saudi Arabia or other countries will enter such agreements, and under what conditions? How does this relate to other ongoing issues in the region? 

Monday, February 8th, 4-5 pm. Online. $10. -- Extended Q & A with Professor Mark Tessler

Tuesday, February 9th, 2-3 pm -- Facilitated discussion with Karen Bantel, Ph.D., OLLI member and instructor; former U-M Professor of Entrepreneurship and Business Strategy. No Cost. 

 
Mark Tessler                Karen Bantel
Mark Tessler is Samuel J. Eldersveld Collegiate Professor of Political Science. He received his Ph.D. in Political Science from Northwestern University, his B.A. from Case Western Reserve University, and has studied at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem and The University of Tunis where he received a Certificate of North African Sociology.  He specializes in Comparative Politics and Middle East Studies. He has studied and/or conducted field research in Tunisia, Israel, Morocco, Egypt, and Palestine (West Bank and Gaza). He is one of the very few American scholars to have attended university and lived for extended periods in both the Arab world and Israel. He has also spent several years teaching and consulting in Sub-Saharan Africa. 

Many of Professor Tessler’s scholarly publications examine the nature, determinants, and political implications of attitudes and values held by ordinary citizens in the Middle East. Among his fifteen books are Public Opinion in the Middle East: Survey Research and the Political Orientations of Ordinary Citizens (2011); Islam, Democracy and the State in Algeria: Lessons for the Western Mediterranean and Beyond (2005); and Area Studies and Social Science: Strategies for Understanding Middle East Politics (1999).  His most recent book, supported by an award from the Carnegie Corporation of New York, is Islam and Politics in the Middle East: Explaining the Views of Ordinary Citizens (2015). Based on 42 nationally representative surveys carried out in 15 countries between 1988 and 2011, this work investigates popular perceptions and preferences relating to the role that Islam should play in government and political affairs. 

Professor Tessler also co-directs the Arab Barometer Survey project. The first wave of Arab Barometer surveys, carried out in eight Arab countries and completed in 2009, was named the best new data set in comparative politics by the American Political Science Association in 2010. The second wave of Arab Barometer surveys was carried out in twelve countries during 2010-2011, and the third wave was carried out in ten countries from late 2012 to early 2014. These data are available through the Arab Barometer website.

Professor Tessler has also conducted research and written extensively on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. His publications on the subject include A History of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, which won national honors and was named a “Notable Book of 1994” by The New York Times. An updated and expanded edition of this book was published in 2009.

To Register: Visit OLLI’s Website Course Catalog. Sign in at www.olli-umich.org.


OLLI's Distinguished Lecture Series Presents...
Tuesday, February 9th, 10:00 am – 11:30 pm. Online. $10

How to Win the Game… and Keep Winning
It seems ironic that in a business which is increasingly competitive, most managers fail to appreciate the basic nature of competition. And more important they do not know how to win the game ……. Or keep on winning. The purpose of this presentation is therefore to explore the nature of competition, and thereby the methods to win the game ….and keep on winning.

John Branch currently teaches a variety of marketing and international business courses at the undergraduate, MBA and executive levels at the Stephen M... Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan and serves as Co-Director of the Yaffe Digital Media Initiative. Previously he was Academic Director of the School’s weekend and evening MBA programs. In addition, he serves as Director of Educational Outreach at the University’ at the University’s William Davidson Institute. He also holds an appointment at the University’s Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian studies.


To Register: Visit OLLI’s Website Course Catalog. Sign in at www.olli-umich.org.

OLLI Special Projects Presents – Medical Ethics 101 Three-Part Series. Sponsored by Hillary Murt and Bruce Friedman, Honoring the Healthcare Providers at Michigan Medicine for Their Bravery and Service

Wednesday, February 10th, 10:00 am – 11:30 am. Online. $10/Lecture; Series $25

LECTURE #2: Ethics at the End of Life: Principles and Case Discussions; and The Interplay between Medical Ethics and Evolving Medical Science
Faculty: Adam Marks, M.D.


To Register: Visit OLLI’s Website Course Catalog. Sign in at www.olli-umich.org.


OLLI’s Third Thursday Morning Lecture Series - Advances in Science

This lecture is sponsored by Rebecca Van Dyke in honor of her father, Henry Van Dyke, a 13-year member of the OLLI Lectures Committee.


Thursday, February 11th, 10:00 am - 11:30 am. Online. $10

Human Dispersal(s) from Africa
Professor Kingston will like to review the evidence for migratory events of early hominins out of Africa as they spread out into the Old World, presumably in response to changing climatic conditions and possibly demographic pressures. 

Professor Kingston will examine environmental proxies potentially linked to these dispersal events and genetic evidence for the timing and nature of movement of early hominins.

Professor Kingston is a Biological Anthropologist interested in reconstructing the environmental context of various stages of human evolution. He conducts field research primarily in Africa at various fossil sites, ranging from localities that have yielded remains of apes predating the origin of the human lineage, sites from which fossil humans (hominins) have been recovered, and more recent archeological localities. 

He is especially interested in identifying factors that drove or mediated evolutionary innovations in our lineage. In this research, he utilizes biogeochemical approaches to reconstruct dietary ecology, climatic conditions, and vegetational structure.

To Register: Visit OLLI’s Website Course Catalog. Sign in at
www.olli-umich.org.


The Lunch Bunch invites you to participate in guided discussions and personal reflections following each of the lectures in the Thursday Morning Lecture Series: Advances in Science 


These guided discussion and personal reflection sessions are free--no registration is required.

Each session will be facilitated by a member of the Lectures' subcommittee that created the series. Rebecca VanDyke will facilitate the February 11 12noon – 1pm discussion and reflection session on Human Dispersal(s) from Africa.
This Lunch Bunch session follows the conclusion of the lecture and the Q&A.  Log on prior to 12noon at

https://umich.zoom.us/j/95574902503
Audio only dial: 1-312-626-6799 Meeting ID: 95574902503

UPCOMING OLLI PROGRAMS
OLLI Special Projects Presents – OLLI @ Home Series
Monday, February 15th, 3:00 – 4:30 pm. Online. $10
  

All About Succulents  
The day after Valentine’s Day, Dani Vignos, owner of University Flower Shop, will offer us a glimpse into her shop and how to create interesting and attractive succulent gardens. 

Mike Palmer, a horticulturist at the Matthaei Botancial Gardens, will talk about the care and propagation of succulents at home. He will treat the audience to beautiful slides from the greenhouse and talk about how to successfully grow succulents at home. Spoiler alert: Succulents do not like to be watered too often.

Mike Palmer, Greenhouse Research Coordinator, has been with Matthaei Botanical Gardens since 1990, joining the staff after he received his B.S. in Commercial Horticulture from Purdue University. At Purdue he focused his studies on woody plants and plant propagation, with emphasis on botanical nomenclature and public gardens. At Matthaei, Mike coordinates research in the greenhouses and is gatekeeper for research projects on the grounds.

University Flower Shop, established in 1931, is a floral design studio and shop in Ann Arbor’s historic Nickels Arcade. Led by owner and designer, Danielle Vignos, he shop creates custom floral arrangements and wrapped bouquets for any mood and all occasions. The flower shop team team is always in search of interesting and seasonal ingredients to keep minds inspired and guests intrigued. 

 
 

To Register: Visit OLLI’s Website Course Catalog. Sign in at www.olli-umich.org.

OLLI’s Urgent and Critical Lecture Series Presents 
Tuesday, February 16th, 10:00 - 11:30 am. Free
 
Mental Health Perspectives During the COVID-19 Pandemic 
As the pandemic continues without a specific end in sight, many of us here and around the world continue to struggle emotionally. Two experts will shed light on how those struggles are manifesting themselves today and what we can anticipate in the mental health realm going forward. Dr. Sheria Robinson-Lane will focus on pandemic impacts in older adults. Dr. Sheila Marcus will speak to mental health implications of the pandemic on adults and children as well as strategies for managing associated ongoing stress.

Sheria Robinson-Lane, PhD, RN, is a gerontologist with expertise in palliative care, long-term care, and nursing administration. She has focused her career on the care and support of older adults with cognitive and/or functional disabilities. Dr. Robinson-Lane is interested in the ways that older adults adapt to changes in health, and particularly how adaptive coping strategies effect health outcomes. Her research is focused on reducing health disparities for minority older adults with cognitive impairments and their informal caregivers. Prior to coming to coming to the University of Michigan School of Nursing, Dr. Robinson-Lane completed an NIHfunded advanced research rehabilitation training program in community living and participation with the University of Michigan Medical School.

Sheila M. Marcus, MD, is a Clinical Professor in the UM Department of Psychiatry and Division head of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. She leads a statewide program MC3 which assists primary care providers throughout the state in caring for individuals with mental health concerns. During COVID pandemic, she has assisted primary care providers and first-line providers with psychological first aid and balancing the stress of the pandemic with work and home obligations.


To Register: Visit OLLI’s Website Course Catalog. Sign in at www.olli-umich.org.

OLLI Special Projects Presents – Medical Ethics 101 Three-Part Series. Sponsored by Hillary Murt and Bruce Friedman, Honoring the Healthcare Providers at Michigan Medicine for Their Bravery and Service
February 17, 2021, 10:00 - 11:30 am. Online. $10
 
LECTURE #3: (a) Key Legal Cases in Medical Ethics; and (b) Ethics of Human Research.
Faculty: Edward Goldman, J.D

To Register: Visit OLLI’s Website Course Catalog. Sign in at
www.olli-umich.org.

Afternoons with OLLI Committee Presents

Wednesday, February 17th, 3:30 – 5:00 pm. Online. $5

Washtenaw Refugee Coalition – Refugees Given a Voice
Over the recent years we have all become more aware of the plight of refugees and asylum seekers. Individuals and families from around the world are fleeing from war, poverty, and oppression. Attempts to enter our country have been met with physical and regulatory obstruction, all in conflict with values many of us hold dear. Refugees and asylum seekers, who are often invisible to those in power, must rely on others to plead their collective cases to Congress.

A group of Ann Arborites have decided to take action to address this injustice. The Washtenaw Refugee Coalition is a new interfaith group of passionate and dedicated individuals who are learning how to advocate on behalf of refugees and asylum seekers. You will be fascinated to hear the story of the group’s founding, the training they have received, and actions they have been taking. You may even find their cause to be one you want to embrace.

Beth Wilensky is the founder and leader of the Washtenaw Refugee Coalition. Beth has served on the Board of Jewish Family Services (a local organization providing services to refugees), and is a Clinical Professor of Law in the Legal Practice Program at the University of Michigan. 

To Register: Visit OLLI’s Website Course Catalog. Sign in at www.olli-umich.org.


OLLI’s Third Thursday Morning Lecture Series - Advances in Science    
Thursday, February 18th, 10:00 - 11:30 am. Online. $10                      

Today’s rapid environmental change from human actions and ongoing geologic activity of our planet require that modern human society is able to prepare,
absorb, respond and adapt to adverse conditions, captured by the concept of ‘Societal Resilience’. Scientific understanding of the challenges is
required for meaningful action.

Ben van der Pluijm is BR Clark Collegiate Professor of Geology and Professor of the Environment at the University of Michigan. His research areas are
Structure/Tectonics, dealing with the geologic evolution of Earth’s crust from minerals to mountains, and Geohazards and Societal Resilience, dealing
with planet-human interactions. 


To Register: Visit OLLI’s Website Course Catalog. Sign in at www.olli-umich.org.
 
Open Study Groups Available for Registration!
 
“Poverty: Looking from Inside Out” Starting February 10th 
Wednesdays, 10-11:30 am, February 10 – March 3.  Online.  $30
We are seeing important new initiatives by the Biden administration to begin to address poverty. How many of us really understand what it is like to be living in poverty? What stereotypes might affect how we think about those struggling? What might be done to help on a local level?  The OLLI study group, "Poverty: Looking from the Inside Out" begins on Wednesday, February 10. It is led by Suzanne Van Dam who leads a local program helping motivated residents work their way out of poverty. You will find this offering (page 47 in the catalog) to be rewarding.
Instructor:  Suzanne Van Dam

To Register:  Visit OLLI’s Website Course Catalog.  Sign in at
www.olli-umich.org


Crisis in U. S. – North Korean Relations – Dealing with an Enigmatic, Hostile Power
Tuesdays, 1-2:30 pm, February 23 – March 23.  Online.  $35
This program places participants in the shoes of national security decision-makers facing major crises with North Korea. The first crisis is the Korean War, where our group will review the historical context, the players, and organizations involved. The second crisis is hypothetical but a very plausible, present-day scenario where U.S. and North Korean relations deteriorate and threaten to escalate into a major conflict. The heart of the class is
role-playing through a simulated National Security Council (NSC) meeting, designed to have participants suggest and discuss courses of action for the President. Background readings and supportive materials are easily accessible through the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) website as well as provided by the course leader. 

Instructor: John Fogarasi is both a lecturer and practitioner of U.S. foreign policy, having taught political science/international affairs earlier in his career and later as a senior U.S. Diplomat for over 30 years with assignments in Europe, Asia and North America. From 2002-2006, John served as Minister-Counselor at theU.S. Embassy to South Korea. 

To Register:  Visit OLLI’s Website Course Catalog.  Sign in at www.olli-umich.org.


Comparing Transitions to Democracy in 18th Century France and 20th Century South Africa
Tuesdays, 1-2:00 pm, February 23 - April 13.  Online.  $45
In comparing transitions to democracy in late 18th century France and late 20th century South Africa, this study group will explore some of the fundamental factors that may determine the viability of democracy in a given society. Why were black and white South Africans able to cobble together the relatively peaceful resolution of their political conflicts that consistently eluded supposedly enlightened 18th century Frenchmen? Why was a process of negotiation successful in South Africa but largely absent from the French Revolution? What role did political leadership, in particular that of Nelson Mandela, playhttp://www.olli-umich.org in shaping these distinct outcomes? 

Instructor:  Barry Shapiro is Professor Emeritus of History, Allegheny College, Meadville, PA, and is a specialist in the study of the French Revolution.

To Register:  Visit OLLI’s Website Course Catalog.  Sign in at www.olli-umich.org.

 
OLLI’s Study Group Committee Announces a New Series! 
"Science Pop-Ups"
Hosted by Craig Stephan and comprising two (perhaps more) series of talks on a variety of scientific topics by experts in the field from all over the U.S. and Canada.  The talks will be held on Thursday afternoons starting variously at 1:00, 2:00, or 3:00, depending on the availability and time zone of the speaker.  The talks are nominally 45-60 minutes in length, with plenty of time afterwards for questions and discussion.  They do not presuppose any scientific expertise on the part of the participants. 

Series 1 consists of five talks. $10/Lecture; Series $35
(1) February 18, 3:00 - 4:30 pm
Plasticity, epigenetics, & evolution 
by Prof. David Pfennig, Univ. of North Carolina

(2) February 25, 1:00 - 2:30 pm
What happened to the mammoths? Exploring the cause of North America’s most recent mass extinction  
by Prof. Todd Surovell, Univ. of Wyoming

[March 4, 1:00 - 2:30 pm
Brain aging and what you can do about it  
by Prof. Thad Polk, Univ. of Michigan
N.b.:  This talk, scheduled earlier, is not part of this series and must be registered for separately.]

(3) March 11, 2:00 - 3:30 pm
Ten years later: Nuclear power after Fukushima  
by Prof. M.V. Ramana, Univ. of British Columbia
March 11 is the tenth anniversary of the Fukushima disaster. 

(4) March 18, 1:00 - 2:30 pm
The Search for the Fountain of Youth  
by Prof. Corinna Ross, Texas A&M Univ.

(5) March 25, 1:00 - 2:30 pm
The scientific quest for the origin of life 
by Prof. Nick Hud, Georgia Inst. of Technology

To Register:  Visit OLLI’s Website Course Catalog.  Sign in at www.olli-umich.org.
 
If you would like more information about Michigan Medicine resources during this challenging time, please reach out to OLLI Director Lisa Barton at 734-998-9356 or libarton@umich.edu. She will be happy to connect you.
For added security, all Commons events going forward will be locked ten minutes after they begin, so thanks for arriving promptly!

Check the Commons Calendar regularly at 
olli-umich.org/commons-calendar
On the calendar you’ll find opportunities to connect through informal groups moderated by OLLI volunteers, demonstrations, discussions that follow OLLI events and more.  
Access to events in the Commons is always
free, and no registration is required.
Bookmark or save the link below – it’s the only one you’ll ever need!
https://umich.zoom.us/j/95574902503
Audio only dial: 1-312-626-6799 Meeting ID: 95574902503


In the Commons February 8 – 12
 
•    February 9th, 2021 2-3 pm -- Facilitated discussion with Karen Bantel, Ph.D., OLLI member and instructor; former U-M Professor of Entrepreneurship and Business Strategy

Followup to February 8th presentation in Torn from the Headlines . . . 

New Muslim Alliances with Israel and their Impact on the Middle East
Why has the Trump Administration vigorously pursued normalized relations between Israel and Muslim states - that long have been aligned with the cause of the Palestinians – in recent months?  In December, Morocco joined Bahrain, Sudan, and the United Arab Emirates in the Abraham Accords: agreements to set aside generations of hostilities toward Israel over the Palestinian conflict as part of a campaign to stabilize the Middle East and North Africa.  What are the key goals for Mr. Trump and Mr. Netanyahu, and what are the implications for the U.S.’s foreign policy in the Biden Administration? What other countries could suffer adverse consequences?  What is the likelihood that Saudi Arabia or other countries will enter such agreements, and under what conditions? How does this relate to other ongoing issues in the region? 

•    The Schmoozery:  Wednesday February 10th   1 – 2pm

•    The Lunch Bunch:  Thursday  February 11th   Noon – 1pm
Rebecca VanDyke will facilitate the after-lecture discussion on Human Dispersal(s) from Africa




Poetry Reading with Ginny Bentz:  Friday February 19th, 7- 8pm
You’re invited to a Poetry Reading. Please bring a poem of your own or a favorite one written by someone else. You will have about five minutes to read aloud and to give some context, so one longer poem or two short ones work well. If you’d rather just listen, that’s okay too. Sip on a glass of wine or a cup of tea as we sit back, relax, and applaud each unique offering! Contact Ginny Bentz at ginny.bentz@gmail.com for details.

Want to schedule a meeting, recurring meet-up group, or family event in the Commons?
Email olli.info@umich.edu with 1 or 2 sentences about your plan and your phone number. Lisa Barton or a representative of the Social Interaction Committee will be in touch with you to schedule the Commons event and put it on the Commons calendar.
Growing Portraits with Grass | That’s Amazing
To view click this link: https://youtu.be/cibOtoYn6d0

Graduate Coordinator Builds LEGO Model of Central Campus 
To read entire article click here: https://record.umich.edu/articles/graduate-coordinator-builds-lego-model-of-central-campus/
If you would like more information about Michigan Medicine resources during this challenging time, please reach out to OLLI Director Lisa Barton at 734-998-9356 or libarton@umich.edu. She will be happy to connect you.

COVID-19 Resources and Services in Washtenaw County
CDC: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html
Washtenaw Community Health Department: https://www.washtenaw.org/3095/COVID-19
Michigan Medicine: https://www.uofmhealth.org/coronavirus-covid-19-update


COVID-19 Help and Services Washtenaw County - Google Docs
 
Grocery Store, Pharmacy & Fresh Food Hours for Ann Arbor Seniors
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