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Earth Day 50th Anniversary Lecture Series:

The Sky is Calling by Diane Turnshek



4:30 PM - 6 PM
MMCH 103, Breed Hall

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Physics Department lecturer Diane Turnshek fights the creep of light pollution in the world, hoping that everyone can someday look up and see the Milky Way from wherever they live.

The International Dark-sky Association gave Turnshek a Dark Sky Defended Award for bringing public awareness to the issues of light pollution.

Do you realize that humanity substantially increases the world's carbon footprint and wastes billions of dollars a year producing light that does nothing more than travel up into the sky? Light pollution causes a degradation of nighttime ecosystems, negatively impacting plants and animals, and well as endangering human health and safety.

Excess light at night robs us of dark skies full of stars, a loss for lay people and astronomers alike. The view of objects in the heavens is diminishing more rapidly than ever, due to the advent of LEDs.