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Dear Colleagues,
 
What a warm welcome I have received since arriving at Georgia State! I am energized every day by the discovery and learning that our departments and institutes are engaged in. I still have many departments to visit this semester, and I look forward to hearing from you.

In this newsletter, I plan to share updates on college business and other issues, announce upcoming events, and celebrate your accomplishments.
 
Although a newsletter will never be exhaustive of all the work that we do, I would like for it to be as inclusive as possible. I encourage you to share your achievements and those of your colleagues  so that we can help you publicize them. Please do not hesitate to forward any such items to us at dasoff@gsu.edu.
 
Continue reading for a look at some of the exciting things going on around the college. And thank you for all that you do.

 
Faculty Publication Highlights
 
Stephen B. Dobranski, Distinguished University Professor of English, Milton’s Visual Imagination: Imagery in “Paradise Lost” (Cambridge University Press, 2015, printed 2016).

Dobranski proposes that Milton enriches his biblical source text with acute and sometimes astonishing visual details, contrary to the traditional view of Milton as an author who wrote for the ear more than the eye. He contends that Milton's imagery - traditionally disparaged by critics - advancesthe epic's narrative while expressing the author's heterodox beliefs. Bringing together Milton's material philosophy with an analysis of both his poetic tradition and cultural circumstances, this book is a major contribution to our understanding of early modern visual culture as well as of Milton's epic.
 
Michael Galchinsky, professor of English, The Modes of Human Rights Literature: Towards a Culture without Borders (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016).

Galchinsky argues that human rights literature both helps the persecuted to cope with their trauma and undergirds a cosmopolitan ethos of universal civility - a culture without borders. He maintains that - no matter how many treaties there are - that  a rights-respecting world will not truly exist until people everywhere can imagine it. He describes four major forms of human rights literature: protest, testimony, lament, and laughter to reveal how such works give common symbolic forms to widely held sociopolitical emotions.
 
Lynée Lewis Gaillet, professor and chair of English, Landmark Essays on Archival Research. (Eds. Lynée Lewis Gaillet, Diana Eidson, and Donald Gammill). Landmark Series. Eds. James Jerry Murphy and Krista Ratcliffe. (Routledge, 2016).

This collection gathers more than 20 years of essays addressing archival research methodologies and methods. These include: emerging technologies, changing notions of access, emerging concerns about issues of representation, fluid definitions of what constitutes an archive, and the place of archival research in hybrid research methods. The collection will be of interest to scholars working on topics related to postmodern, feminist, working class, and cultural issues.
 
EsakiBrett Esaki, assistant professor of Religious Studies, Enfolding Silence: The Transformation of Japanese American Religion and Art under Oppression (Oxford University Press, 2016).

Esaki documents the traditions of complex silence Japanese Americans have developed to survive moments of racial and religious oppression through four case studies - art gardening, origami, jazz, and monuments. Drawing from religious studies, ethnic studies, theology, anthropology, art, music, history, and psychoanalysis, he highlights the use of silence to communicate the complex emotions of historical survival, religious experience, and artistic inspiration.
 
mcclymondKathryn McClymond, professor and chair of Religious Studies, Ritual Gone Wrong: What We Learn from Ritual Disruption (Oxford University Press, 2016).

McClymond investigates how religious traditions prepare for and accommodate ritual mistakes. Many traditions incorporate errors into their ritual systems - how rituals can be disrupted, how disruptions can be addressed, and when disruptions have gone too far.Through case studies ranging from ancient India to modern day Iraq, and from medieval allegations of child sacrifice to contemporary Olympic ceremonies, McClymond demonstrates that the ritual is by nature fluid, supple, and dynamic.
 
Henry F. (“Chip”) Carey, associate professor of political science (Ed.), The Challenges of European Governance in the Age of Economic Stagnation, Immigration, and Refugees (Lexington Books, 2016).

Carey examines the European Union, where regional inter-governmental institutions have kept the peace for 70 years, but produced episodes of crisis from overstretching jurisdictions, thematically and geographically. Europe has polarized between nationalist and integrative forces, which have displaced the earlier idealistic aspirations to build the rule of law and deter violence. Academics and policy makers will learn from the various legal and political efforts to integrate supranational and inter-governmental agencies with national political systems.

Caison, Gina, assistant professor of English, and Amy Clukey. “Afterword: Future Souths—Emerging Voices in Southern Studies.” PMLA 131.1 (Jan. 2016): 193-196.

 
See more faculty publications here.
New Grants and Fellowships:
 
  • Theo Ten Brumelaar, array director, and Douglas Gies, center director of the Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy, won a $3.9 million grant from the National Science Foundation for providing scientists around the world better access to CHARA and its data.
  • Alexander Zelikovsky, Distinguished University Professor of computer science, was awarded $200,000 from the NSF as part of a  multi-institution project to develop software for epidemiology laboratories. The software will enable the global tracking of viral infections and timely identification of outbreaks.
  • Christopher Cornelison, post-doctoral associate in biology, received $122,248 from the Conservation fund for "Development and implementation of a multi-year integrated disease management system for white-nose syndrome at Black Tunnel, Georgia."
  • Ning Fang, associate professor of chemistry, received a $300,000 grant from the NSF for his project, “Understanding Rotational Dynamics of Cargo in Intracellular Transport with Plasmonic Nanoparticle Probes.”
  • Suazette Mooring, assistant professor of chemistry, was awarded $179,347 from the National Science Foundation (NSF) as part of a collaborative project with Spellman College entitled, “Factors of Success in a Community-based, Interactive Engagement Learning Environment: Perspectives from a Minority Serving Institution.”
  • Draga Vidakovic, professor of mathematics, secured a $310,409 grant from the NSF in support of a collaborative project with faculty at North Dakota State University, “Promoting Reasoning in Undergraduate Mathematics (PRIUM).” Guantao Chen, Professor and Chair of the Department of Mathematics & Statistics, and Valerie Miller, Associate Professor of Mathematics, are Co-Principal Investigators on the grant.
  • Xiaojing Ye, assistant professor of mathematics, was awarded $99,770 from the NSF for a collaborative project with Georgia Tech on “Prediction, Optimization and Control for Information Propagation on Networks: A Differential Equation and Mass Transportation Based Approach."
  • Andrew I. Cohen, associate professor of philosophy and director of the Jean Beer Blumenfeld Center for Ethics, and Kathryn McClymond, professor and chair of religious studies, were awarded $180,000 from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) for their project on “Reparative Justice and Moral Injury among Post-Deployment Soldiers.” The project is a multidisciplinary study of the impact of moral injury on members of the armed forces through structured focus groups guided by philosophical questions.
  • Andrew Wedeman, professor of political science, was awarded a prestigious fellowship with the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars for the 2016-17 academic year. Wedeman will work on his project entitled, “Corruption, Unrest and Repression: Implications for China’s Rise and Sino-American Strategic Relations.”
  • Tricia King, professor of psychology, was awarded $183,148 from the Rett Syndrome Research Trust for a multi-institution grant. The project, “Development of a Rett Syndrome Outcome Measure,” aims to develop standardized assessments for detecting Rett Syndrome to be used in clinical trials.
  • Robin Morris, Regents’ Professor of psychology and associate provost for Strategic Initiatives, received a $900,000 grant from the Oak Foundation for his project, entitled “Identifying Dyslexia Interventions for Treatment of Non-Responders.”
  • David Sehat, associate professor of history, was named the John G. Winant Visiting Professor of American Government at Oxford University in the U.K. for the 2017-2018 academic year. Sehat will be working on a new book on the history of secularism in the U.S.
  • Anu Bourgeois, associate professor of computer science, secured $264,816 in funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to lead a feasibility study that will aid software engineers in the further development of Epi Info, a software platform developed by the CDC that is used by over one million public healthcare workers to easily collect and analyze data.
  • Katherine Hankins, associate professor of geography, was awarded $220,323 as a subconsultant on a Georgia Department of Transportation study evaluating impacts of reversible toll lanes on the northwest and southeast corridors of Interstate 75 in Georgia.
    Jessica Turner, associate professor of psychology, received $373,485 from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for a collaborative project with Florida International University, “Integrative Knowledge Modeling in Cognitive Neuroimaging.”
    Rengin Firat Hines, assistant professor in the Global Studies Institute, is collaborating with the University of Iowa on a project funded by the Army Research College, looking at “Moral Schemes, Cultural Conflict, and Socio-Political Action.”

     

 
Media Mentions:

Steve Wrigley, B.A. alumnus in History, was named chancellor of the University System of Georgia. More

Sean Richey, associate professor of political science, spoke to 11Alive about the difficulty of voter fraud in the upcoming presidential election. More

Peter Lindsay, associate professor of political science, wrote an op-ed in The Hill about the relationship between racism and the believe in voter fraud. More 

Lindsay also wrote a philosophical critique of libertarian economics for The Conversation. More

Jeffrey Glover, associate professor of anthropology, is leading a team of student archeologists at Fort Daniel in Gwinnett County. More

Margaret Venable, M.S. alum in chemistry, was named president of Dalton State College. More

Dana Nichols, Ph.D. alumna in ALESL, was named Vice President of Academic Affairs at Chattanooga State Community College. More


Theo Ten Brumelaar, array director for CHARA, was interviewed on WSB-TV along with other Georgia State astronomers in an article about new technology at the array and its ability to detect space weather. More
 
Featured Event: Ambassador John Crocker

Join Ambassador Ryan Crocker and Georgia State University Political Science Senior Lecturer Chris Brown for a student-faculty dialogue on the upcoming challenges for the new administration in the endless war in the Middle East.

Crocker is a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom and has served as United States Ambassador to Afghanistan (2011 to 2012), Iraq (2007 to 2009), Pakistan (2004 to 2007), Syria (1998 to 2001), Kuwait (1994 to 1997), and Lebanon(1990 to 1993).

Brown is a senior lecturer of political science and vice president for research and analysis for the World Affairs Council of Atlanta.

The event will take place Tuesday, November 29 at 2:30 pm in the Ceremonial Courtyard on the lower level of the School of Law, 85 Park Place NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.

This event is hosted by the Department of Political Science and the World Affairs Council of Atlanta. Sponsors are the Office of International Initiatives, Honors College,  Global Studies Institute and Phi Sigma Alpha.

More Events

Featured Event: Ambassador John Crocker

Join Ambassador Ryan Crocker and Georgia State University Political Science Senior Lecturer Chris Brown for a student-faculty dialogue on the upcoming challenges for the new administration in the endless war in the Middle East.

Crocker is a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom and has served as United States Ambassador to Afghanistan (2011 to 2012), Iraq (2007 to 2009), Pakistan (2004 to 2007), Syria (1998 to 2001), Kuwait (1994 to 1997), and Lebanon(1990 to 1993).

Brown is a senior lecturer of political science and vice president for research and analysis for the World Affairs Council of Atlanta.

The event will take place Tuesday, November 29 at 2:30 pm in the Ceremonial Courtyard on the lower level of the School of Law, 85 Park Place NE, Atlanta, GA 30303.

This event is hosted by the Department of Political Science and the World Affairs Council of Atlanta. Sponsors are the Office of International Initiatives, Honors College,  Global Studies Institute and Phi Sigma Alpha.

More Events

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