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Corsica Currents, January 2020
News for CRYC Members
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> Commodore's Corner
Mike Hollis

 

It’s been cold and wet– I toured the grounds this weekend.   Overall everything looks good albiet soggy.  
We will be hosting a Mid-winter Brunch at Doc’s on Sat 14 March beginning at 10am.  It is a great opportunity to reconnect with other members and exchange thoughts with leadership.  We will have a station set up to sell some wares, validate your membership information and even pay your dues.  Cost will be $17.50 which includes tax and tip.
            Board members attempted to contact as many members as possible via phone this month.  This person to person out-reach was intended to confirm the data that we had on each member regarding email addresses, phone numbers, boats owned etc…  If you have not received a phone call it may be that we have incorrect / invalid information.  We will continue to try to contact you through the end of February.  After that we will have rosters available at various club events.  Please stop by to update / confirm your personel data.
            Plans for the new schoolhouse / shed are moving rapidly.  This asset will greatly increase organization ans capabilities for both the schoolhouse and race management.  The cost is in the $7,000 range and we are currently seeking donations, large or small, to help defray the club expenditure.
            Attached / linked you will find the 2020 CRYC calendar.  We have a sprinkling of racing and social events throughout the year and hope to have much member participation.  Of note will be the Annual Regatta in 24-26 July and (for the first time in many years) we will be host the Comet National Championships 10-12 October.  These events are our two heavy lifts and will require support from many of you to make them fully successful.  Thanks in advance.
            Finally, if you have not paid your 2020 dues – please do so.
 
Regards,
Mike Hollis, Commodore
 

 

> Membership
Gail Owings, Vice Commodore

 

We currently have 104 members. Dues notices for 2020 were sent in mid-January via postcard to all members, payment is due by March 1, 2020.  Payment should be via check to the CRYC, PO Box 24, Centerville, MD 21617.  Online payments via the club wevsite will now have a flat service charge of $10. 
 
2020 membership cards will be issued prior to 1 April along with necessary lock combinations. 
 
Board members have already or will be reaching out to each of you via phone during January / February to confirm / update your member data.  Please provide accurate data and constructive thoughts
 


>Buildings and Grounds
John Foster Rear Commodore

 

The new schoolhouse is in the final planning stages and will hopefully be delivered by June.  It will have an internal divider to allow us to compartmentalize CRYC assets from the sailing school.  Additionally an extended roof will provide covered spar storage.  This asset will greatly increase capabilities for both the schoolhouse and race management.  The cost is in the $7,000 range and we are currently seeking donations, large or small, to help defray the club expenditure
 
As we are now in the off-season feel free to enjoy the grounds; however, please remember that the club has no bathrooms or trash collection so please pack out your trash.  Also winter brings high winds so please double check to ensure that your boats are properly secured to their racks or trailers to avoid a blowing boat situation.
 
Please do not drive past an imaginary line running from the pavilion to the school shed because it is boggy this time of year.  Members will be held responsible for repairing any damage to the grounds.  Below photos courtesy of Joe Della Barbra

> Finance
John Friel, Treasurer

Note that there is now a $10.00 service fee to pay your dues online.  If you prefer to pay your dues by mail; the address is:    
Corsica River Yacht Club PO box 24, Centreville, Maryland 21617. 
As a reminder dues are $250 and an additional $25 if you have a kayak rack.
 
Current monies on hand 1 February 2020 is $6400.00 and a capital fund with an additional $10,000.00 in long term CD’s.

>Schools
Gail Owings, Tammy Boone


We are meeting with the YMCA this month to discuss the 2020 sailing school season; look for more details in future Corsica Currents.

> Communications

Joe Della Barba, IT & Gayle Jayne, Secretary


NSTR

> Regatta / Race
Art Silcox,  John Foster

A two day race committee clinic will be hosted by CBYRA at Annapolis Yacht Club on 22 and 23 February. A one day race committee clinic will be held on 18 April at Northeast Yacht Club in Northeast, MD. The Club will pay the fee for several members interested in attending any one of these events and subsequently serving on the race committee. Contact Art Silcox for more info.  artsilcox@gmail.com

> Fleet

Art Silcox, Fleet Captain

Frostbite Series - Continues on most Sundays until late February.  Races begin at 1 pm.
 
SUMMER EVENING RACE SERIES --We are considering hosting a summer evening series and are currently soliciting feedback from members regarding the best evening and how long the series should run.  Right now the proposal is Friday evening mid-June every other week until mid-August.  Also under consideration are Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday.  Please provide your level of interest and other thoughts to Art Silcox
 

> Social
Gail Owings, Vice Commodore & Beth Pinder

 

We will be hosting a mid-winter brunch at Doc’s on Sat 14 March beginning at 10am.  It is a great opportunity to reconnect with other members and exchange thoughts with leadership.  We will have a station set up to sell some club bling, validate your membership information and even pay your dues.  Cost will be $17.50 which includes tax and tip.
 

>
Ships Store
Tammy Boone, Quartermaster

We have recently completed our annual inventory and will be restocking with burgees, hats, shirts and lapel pins.  Wares will be displayed during club events including the Mid-Winter Brunch and Commissioning Day on 3 May.
 
  • Land’s End - CRYC logo items may be purchased through Lands' End.  You will need to create your own account and create a library of logos that you can use.  Although there are a few steps involved, it is worth the time setting it all up. When you order an item, you can preview it and adjust the placement of the logo on the garment.
  •   Here's how to get set up:
    • 1.Log in or or create an account with Lands' End Business (This is separate from regular Lands' End.)
    •  2.Once you have created an account and/or signed in, use the drop down menu under your name in the upper right corner to click on "Logos".
    •  3.Click on "Associate a Logo to my Account"
    •  4.Use Logo #'s: 1150832 and/or 1150825 and Customer #: 7179521
That's all there is to it!  You are ready to order. 
 

>More Opportunities to Serve

  • If you have ideas and suggestions to share please feel free to email or call.  If you would like to assist with a committee, event or project, trust me, we have a job for you.  contact@cryc.org
     
  • Club photographer - Volunteer needed to photo document club events.  Wide range of access granted.
  •  
  • Coffee / Donut Person – Seeking individual(s) to setup breakfast at four events over the year.  65 cup coffeemaker provided.
  •  
  • Public relations / Recruiting  – Seeking individuals to represent the club at various community events to provide information about the club and recruit new members. 
  •  
  • Public relations / Media – Seeking individuals to provide updates to local and regional media with the goal of increasing awareness of the club and its activities.
  •  
  • Contact: Commodore@cryc.org for info on the above positions

>Upcoming Events

1 March                                 
1 April                                    
4 April                                     
25 April                                  
3 May                                     
 

Last date for dues payment w/o late fee

Gate and Head combinations change

Opening work Party / New Member Orientation

Comet Spring Series 1

Commissioning Day / Semi-annual Meeting / Covered dish
 

>Contact the CRYC Board



Send email to contact@cryc.org.  Your email will be received by each Board member.
To contact Commodore Mike Hollis, send email to commodore@cryc.org
View Phone Directory for BOD Members


View Phone Directory for BOD Members

>Classified Ads



Would you like to advertise here?  Got something to sell?  Are you a skipper seeking a crew or crew seeking a boat?  Contact commodore@cryc.org or  contact@cryc.org
 
FOR SALE: 420 Sailboats.  The Club is selling 4 excess 420 sailboats.  All are in good condition.  $350.00 ea.  No trailer.  Contact Art Silcox 571 213 9356 or art.silcox@gmail.com
 
OPTIMIST DINGHY (INT)
  
Hull Type:   Pram (Daggerboard)
Rigging Type:   Sprit/Lug
LOA:   7.67 ft / 2.34 m
LWL:   7.08 ft / 2.16 m
Beam:   3.50 ft / 1.07 m
Draft (max):   3.17 ft / 0.97 m
Draft (min):   0.33 ft / 0.10 m
Displacement:   92 lb / 42 kg
Disp./Len.:   115.73
Construction:   Wood/FG
First Built:   1947
# Built:   400000
Designer:   Clark Mills
 
The Optimist, also known as the ‘opti’, 'oppie', or 'bathtub' is a small, single-handed sailing dinghy intended for use by children up to the age of 15. Contemporary boats are usually made of fibreglass, although wooden boats are still built.  It is one of the most popular sailing dinghies in the world, with over 150,000 boats officially registered with the class and many more built but never registered.  The Optimist is recognized as an International Class by the International Sailing Federation.
 
The Optimist was designed in 1947 by American Clark Mills at the request of the Clearwater Florida Optimist service club following a proposal by Major Clifford McKay to offer low-cost sailing for young people.  The Optimist Club ran a soap box derby, but wanted more than a single-day event. Thus they were looking for a low-cost equivalent for sailing.  He designed a simple pram that could be built from two 4' x 8' sheets of plywood.  and donated the plan to the Optimists. The design was slightly modified and introduced to Europe by Axel Damgaard, and spread outwards across Europe from Scandinavia.  The design was standardized in 1960 and became a strict One-Design in 1995.  A full history of the Optimist is published as: Wilkes, Robert (2013). The Optimist Dinghy 1947-2007. ISBN 978-1484911969.
The Optimist is sailed in over 120 countries and it is one of only two yachts approved by the International Sailing Federation exclusively for sailors under 16.  Optimists are one of the smallest sailing dinghys. Sailors can continue to race them up to the age limit of 15 years old. Optimists are single handed boats. Many sailing schools and yacht clubs own a number of them and they are the first boat most beginners will sail.
 
Description
Rig:  The single sail of the Optimist is sprit-rigged. Two battens stiffen the leech. It is secured evenly with ties along the luff to the mast and along the foot to the boom, pulled down tightly by a vang/kicker. The light, slim third spar, the sprit, extends through a loop at the peak of the sail; the bottom rests in the eye of a short cable or string which hangs along the front edge of the mast. Raising and lowering the sprit and adjusting the boom vang allow for adaptation of sail trim to a range of wind conditions. Similarly, the Optimist has a small string outhaul on the end of the boom. It is usually correct to tighten the boomvang, outhaul, and sprit in heavy winds and loosen them in light winds. As well as this, huge adjustments can be made to sail shape, due to all of the ties running along the mast and boom.  The spars may be made from aluminium or wood, but are invariably aluminium in modern boats.  A monograph-style "IO" insignia (after IODA - the International Optimist Dinghy Association) on the sail is a registered trade-mark and may only be used under licence from the International Optimist Association.
 
Hull:  The Optimist has a pram hull, originally formed primarily from five pieces of plywood. It was the biggest hull Clark Mills could make from two 4 ft by 8 ft sheets. Just in front of a bulkhead, which partitions the boat nearly in half, is the daggerboard case. Right behind it on the centerline of the hull floor are attached a pulley and ratchet block. These anchor the sheet and its pulley on the boom directly above. At the bow resides a thwart to support the mast which passes through a hole in its centre to the mast step mounted on the centre line of the boat. The painter, a rope used for securing a boat like a mooring line, is usually tied around the mast step.
Buoyancy bags are installed inboard along each side in the front half of the boat and at the stern to add buoyancy in the event of capsizing. Two hiking straps run lengthwise along the floor from bulkhead to stern. These and a tiller extension allow a sailor to hang off the side for weight distribution.  This can be crucial to maintaining the boat in near horizontal disposition during heavy air, allowing greater speed through the water and more manoeuvrability.  The vast majority of hulls today are made of Fiberglass, although it is still possible to make and buy wooden hulls.
 
Performance
While younger lighter sailors begin in Optimists, competitive sailors usually weigh between 35 and 55 kg (or between 80 lbs. and 125 lbs.).  Optimists can be sailed by children from age 8 to 15. This wide range of weights which is not typical of most dinghies is made possible by different cuts of sail. Due to its inherent stability, unstayed rig, robust construction and relatively small sail, the Optimist can be sailed in winds of up to 30 knots.  The Optimist is the slowest dinghy in the world according to the RYA Portsmouth Yardstick scheme, with a Portsmouth number of 1646.  Its equivalent rating in the US scheme is a D-PN of 123.6.
 
Competition
The Optimist is the biggest youth racing class in the world.  As well as the annual world championship the class also has six continental championships, attended by a total of over 850 sailors a year.  Many of the top world Optimist sailors have become world-class Laser Radial or 4.7 sailors after they "age-out" but many also excel in double-handers such as the 420.  At the 2016 Olympics at least 85% of the boat skippers were former Optimist sailors.
The first World Championship was held in Great Britain in 1962 and it has grown to over 60 countries participating.   Championships are held on each continent.
 
Manufacture
In recent years, over 2,200 boats a year have been produced by around 30 builders worldwide.
 
 
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