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NEWSLETTER - MARCH 2017
Brain Injury Australia is the central clearinghouse of information and gateway to nationwide referral for optimising the social and economic participation of all Australians living with brain injury.
BIA RECEIVES NATIONAL DISABILITY INSURANCE AGENCY FUNDING
The Australian Federation of Disability Organisations (AFDO) has received a grant from the National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) to work with its member organisations, including Brain Injury Australia, to help them prepare for the national roll-out of Information, Linkages and Capacity Building (ILC). The focus of ILC will be "community inclusion - making sure people with disability are connected into their communities. ILC is all about making sure our community becomes more accessible and inclusive of people with disability." Read more.
BIAWEEK 2017; BRAIN INJURY IN THE MILITARY - THE USE OF ANTI-MALARIAL DRUGS 
Brain injury in the military is usually associated with physical trauma, from blunt force applied to the head or blast exposure. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has become so common among veterans that it has been called the "signature injury" of recent conflicts in the Middle East, alongside post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

The Australian Government's Repatriation Medical Authority recently launched an investigation into whether anti-malarial drugs given to Australian Defence Force personnel could have caused "chemically-acquired brain injury". Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease found in 90 countries. During 2015, there were over 200 million cases of malaria recorded, resulting in 430,000 deaths.

Stuart McCarthy, pictured below, who served with the Australian Army in Afghanistan, Iraq, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Indonesia and Bougainville shares his story with Brain Injury Australia. Read more.
Stuart McCarthy
CAN YOU HELP IMPROVE SERVICES AND SUPPORTS FOR "YOUNG STROKE"?
One in every four strokes – where blood supply to the brain is stopped by a clot or bleeding – now occurs in Australians under 65. And rates of young stroke are rising due to increases in obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes.

Following the success of 2016’s national Brain Injury Awareness Week, Brain Injury Australia now advocates for more and better services and supports that meet the needs of young stroke. You can download Brain Injury Australia’s Position Paper on Young Stroke here. The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health is calling on people aged 18 to 55 who have sustained a stroke to join its study to find ways to improve services for young stroke. Read more.
POST-CONCUSSION SYNDROME, "MILD" TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY: CAN YOU HELP?
As part of its work on the National Disability Insurance Scheme’s Information, Linkages and Capacity Building, referred to at left, Brain Injury Australia is keen to hear from the potentially many thousands of Australians with experience of post-concussion syndrome/ "mild" traumatic brain injuryFind out more.
NEW RESEARCH: DRIVING AFTER CONCUSSION - IS IT ALWAYS SAFE TO DRIVE AFTER SYMPTOMS RESOLVE?
Around 20,000 Australians are hospitalised each year with a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Most TBIs are termed "mild". However, as many as 1 in every 5 people with "mild" TBI don't fully recover within the expected 2 or 3 months. Following the success of Brain Injury Australia's public awareness campaigning on concussion, it will now focus on reaching out to the unknown number of Australians living with post-concussion syndrome/ "mild" TBI.

The disabilities associated with post-concussion syndrome/ "mild" TBI may include problems with thinking, behaviour, and movement, which may impact on your ability to drive. A new study has examined the driving disabilities in people who have experienced concussion Read more.
HERE ARE SOME TIPS ON HOME MODIFICATIONS FOR PEOPLE WITH A BRAIN INJURY
Having a safe and secure home where you are in control of your environment is widely regarded as a foundation of individual well-being and successful inclusion in community life. Prior to discharge from hospital, people with brain injury may need to make changes to their homes to enable them to move around safely and to have sense of control over their living environment. Michael Bleasdale, Chief Executive Officer of Home Modifications Australia, writes for Brain Injury Australia. Learn more.
NEW RESEARCH: HOW DOES "MILD" TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY IMPACT EMPLOYMENT?
Research into return-to-work following brain injury often finds a relationship between injury severity and challenges to stable and sustainable employment. But what of the experience of people sustaining "mild" injury, who comprise 4 in every 5 traumatic brain injury (TBI) hospitalisations in Australia? While as many as 90 per cent of people sustaining a "mild" TBI return to their pre-injury employment within two months of injury, a new study has investigated their experience of return-to-work in the long term. Read more.
Copyright © 2017. Brain Injury Australia. All rights reserved.

Contact Brain Injury Australia
Phone: (02) 9808 9390   |   1-800 BRAIN1 (1-800 272 461)
Email: Simon van Rysewyk, Communications Manager, communications@braininjuryaustralia.org.au

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