Copy
News from the Oxford Department of International Development.
View this email in your browser
ISSUE 2 MARCH 2017
HIGHLIGHTS
Transforming the refugee system
A new book by RSC Director Alexander Betts and Paul Collier, published this month by Penguin, sets out an alternative approach to the refugee crisis, one that can empower refugees to help themselves, contribute to their host societies, and rebuild their countries of origin.
Mindful education in Brazil
New ESRC Global Challenges Research Fund Fellow Elizabeth Rahman outlined her research, which investigates how traditional mindful practices among the Warekena of the Brazilian Amazon can inform sustainable approaches to education.
Measuring poverty in the Americas
The Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative and the Organisation of American States signed a Joint Declaration that aims to promote OPHI's Multidimensional Poverty Index nationally and regionally in the Americas. Find out more.
Leaders in digital diplomacy
The work of our digital diplomacy researchers was recognised in the #SODD16 review of the top performers in the field in 2016, with Corneliu Bjola named No 1 academic and DPhil Ilan Manor named best blogger. Find out more.
Challenging gender myths
On International Women's Day 2017, new Senior Departmental Lecturer Cheryl Doss drew on her research to challenge some oft-cited statistics about women in rural development and called for the use of more nuanced metrics to help inform policy.
NEW PUBLICATIONS

A new special issue of the Journal of Southern African Studies explores Southern African liberation movements from a transnational perspective, examining the movement of ideas, people, institutions and goods across borders. It focusses on African soldiers, politicians and diplomats, whose interactions created opportunities for the circulation and adaptation of a range of cultural, political and military influences. Tracing these interactions within and among liberation movements, their hosts, and a wider set of external actors reveals sometimes surprising legacies.

The latest issue of Forced Migration Review looks at some of the modalities and challenges of resettlement of refugees in order to shed light on debates such as how – and how well – resettlement is managed, whether it is a good use of the funds and energy it uses, and whether it is a good solution for refugees. It contains 33 articles on resettlement, plus a mini-feature on post-deportation risks and monitoring and four articles on other forced migration topics.
ARTICLES & REPORTS

Sabina Alkire, José Manuel Roche, Ana Vaza: Changes Over Time in Multidimensional Poverty: Methodology and Results for 34 Countries in World Development

Nikita Sud: State, scale and networks in the liberalisation of India’s land in Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space

Andreas Georgiadis, Liza Benny, Le Thuc Duc, Sheikh Galab, Prudhvikar Reddy, Tassew Woldehanna: Growth recovery and faltering though early adolescence: Determinants and implications for cognitive development in Social Science & Medicine

Le Thuc Duc and Jere R Behrman: Heterogeneity in predictive power of early childhood nutritional indicators for mid-childhood outcomes: evidence from Vietnam in Journal of Economics and Human Biology

Santiago Cueto, Juan Leon, Alejandra Miranda and M Alejandra Sorto: Teachers’ pedagogical content knowledge and mathematics achievement of students in Peru in Educational Studies in Mathematics: An International Journal

Marta Favara and Alan Sanchez: Psychosocial competencies and risky behaviours in Peru in IZA Journal of Labor & Development

Elspeth Guild, Cathryn Costello, and Violeta Moreno-Lax: Implementation of the 2015 Council Decisions establishing provisional measures in the area of international protection for the benefit of Italy and of Greece
FROM THE BLOG
Peggy Levitt introduced a new special issue of Oxford Development Studies she edited, which explored transnational social protection and put forward a new framework for understanding how people on the move – documented or undocumented, voluntary or forced, permanent, short-term/seasonal, or circulating – are protected and provided for.
Frances Stewart outlined the findings of a new paper that explored whether the way conflicts end influences post-conflict development, using econometric investigation and paired case studies to explore the different implications for subsequent development of outright victories, cease-fires and peace agreements.
DPhil Geraldine Adiku drew on her doctoral research to explore the situation of undocumented migrants in the UK who pay taxes but are unable to access state welfare provision. She suggests that making it easier for migrants to regularise their situation would benefit not only migrants, but also their countries of origin and the host country.
DPhil Alejandro Olayo wrote about humanitarianism from the ground in Mexico, where the changing humanitarian environment has led to the creation of support organisations from within local communities that offer solidarity to undocumented migrants, returning US deportees and, increasingly, refugees.
 
EVENTS
Elizabeth Colson Lecture 2017
Professor Thomas Spijkerboer of Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam on
NOSTALGIA AND LEGITIMACY: UNDERSTANDING THE EXTERNALIZATION OF EUROPEAN MIGRATION POLICY

10 May 2017, 5pm, Oxford Department of International Development, 3 Mansfield Road, Oxford OX1 3TB
Register: https://nostalgia-and-legitimacy.eventbrite.co.uk
Olof Palme Lecture 2017
Professor James Ferguson of Stanford University on
PRESENCE AND SOCIAL OBLIGATION: AN ESSAY ON THE SHARE

8 June 2017, 5pm, Nissan Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College, Oxford OX2 6JF
Register: https://olof_palme_2017.eventbrite.co.uk
Photo credits: Frederic Noy/UNHCR (refugees); Marc Mueller (digital diplomacy); Indrajit Roy (gender myths).
FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA!
Website
Website
Twitter
Twitter
Facebook
Facebook
LinkedIn
LinkedIn
Email
Email
Share
Tweet
Forward
Copyright © 2017 Oxford Department of International Development, All rights reserved.


Want to change how you receive these emails?
You can update your preferences or unsubscribe from this list

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp