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News from the Oxford Department of International Development.
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ISSUE 4 JULY 2017
HIGHLIGHTS
Valuing early stage technologies
A paper co-authored by ODID’s Professor Xiaolan Fu and Dr Shaomeng Li that offers a new approach to valuing early-stage technologies has been named Best Paper by the Innovation Strategic Interest Group at the 2017 European Academy of Management Annual Conference.
Half the world's poor are children
New research by OPHI revealed that in 103 low and middle-income countries surveyed, children constituted 34% of the total population – but 48% of the poor; that's 689 million poor children. The findings come from disaggregation of the latest Global Multidimensional Poverty Index. Find out more.
Leverhulme Early Career Fellowships
Two ODID researchers have won three-year Leverhulme Early Career Fellowships. Robtel Neajai Pailey will research race-based citizenship in Liberia while Susanne Verheul will explore acts of resistance in the Rhodesian and Zimbabwean judiciaries. Find out more.
20 years of the MPhil
The academic year 2016/17 marked the 20th anniversary of the MPhil in Development Studies and we were delighted to welcome back alumni and former staff for a workshop and evening celebration. You can listen to the presentations and find out more about the event here.
Fieldwork across the world
Our first-year MPhil students are heading off for a summer of fieldwork, with 25 projects planned in 17 countries on topics as diverse as the introduction of Uber in Mexico City, women's access to credit in Indonesia and the integration of former child soldiers in Sierra Leone ...to name just a few.
Celebrating Valpy FitzGerald
A new special issue of Oxford Development Studies celebrates the work of Valpy FitzGerald, Emeritus Professor of International Development Finance at ODID. It brings together articles by Valpy's colleagues and former students on the theme of Conflict, Inequalities and Development.
 
More highlights >>
NEW PUBLICATIONS
A new book co-edited by ESRC Future Research Leader Fellow Olly Owen brings together criminologists, anthropologists, sociologists, historians, political scientists and others who have engaged with the police across Africa, and the publics with whom they interact, to provide street-level perspectives from below and inside the continent's police forces.

Police in Africa: The Street-level View is published by Hurst.

A new book by Senior Research Officer Naohiko Omata draws on qualitative and quantitative research to challenge the reputation as a model of ‘self-reliance’ given to Buduburam refugee camp in Ghana and sheds light on considerable economic inequality between refugee households.

The Myth of Refugee Self-Reliance: Economic Lives Inside a Liberian Refugee Camp is published by Berghahn Books.

All displaced people need some form of shelter. Whether it is found, provided or built, it needs to answer multiple needs: protection from the elements, physical security, safety, comfort, emotional security, some mitigation of risk and unease, and even, as time passes, some semblance of home and community. The latest issue of Forced Migration Review looks at the complexity of approaches to shelter, both as a physical object in a physical location and as a response to essential human needs.

ARTICLES & REPORTS

Dawn Chatty 'The duty to be generous (karam): Alternatives to rights-based asylum in the Middle East' in Journal of the British Academy

Robin Cohen & Nicholas Van Hear 'Visions of Refugia: territorial and transnational solutions to mass displacement' in Planning Theory and Practice

Cathryn Costello, Kees Groenendijk and Louise Halleskov Storgaard 'Realising the right to family reunification of refugees in Europe', Issue paper published by the Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights Council of Europe

Marie-Laurence Flahaux 'Home, sweet home? The effect of return migration support mechanisms on reintegration' in Space, Populations, Societies

Xiaolan Fu, Jun Hou and Marco Sanfilippo ‘Highly skilled returnees and the internationalization of EMNEs: Firm level evidence from China’ in International Business Review

Padmini Iyer and Rhiannon Moore 'Measuring learning quality in Ethiopia, India and Vietnam: from primary to secondary school effectiveness' in Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education

Naohiko Omata 'Who takes advantage of mobility? Exploring the nexus between refugees’ movement, livelihoods and socioeconomic status in West Africa' in African Geographical Review

Robtel Neajai Pailey 'Liberia, Ebola and the pitfalls of state-building: Reimagining domestic and diasporic public authority' in African Affairs

Leila Vignal 'The changing borders and borderlands of Syria in a time of conflict' in International Affairs
 
Browse all our publications >>
FROM THE BLOG

In a post for World Refugee Day, Senior Research Officer Naohiko Omata blogged about the need to develop a nuanced understanding of the economic lives of refugees, drawing on RSC research in Kenya to explore what factors help some to thrive while others struggle.

Emilio Travieso wrote about his doctoral research into a Jesuit-backed initiative with the Tseltal people of Chiapas in Mexico which is supporting an alternative model of smallholder coffee and honey production that combines economic upgrading with social and ecological benefits.

In a post ahead of the G20 summit in Berlin, Departmental Lecturer Tristen Naylor wrote that the United States' new revisionist role under President Donald Trump had left global governance without its strongest champion, and suggested the summit could give a clue to likely succesors.

MPhil alumnus Christopher Bredholt described how multilateral development banks are coming up with novel ways to help mitigate risks to investors to encourage financing for infrastructure projects in developing and emerging economies.
 

Read more from the blog >>
Photo credits: James Jewell/OPHI (child poverty); Keith Barnes photography (MPhil 20th anniversary)
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