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Altona Woodworkers Club- Newsletter Autumn 2018
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Term Newsletter No.2 -Autumn 2019

A message from our President.
Hi Everyone, I hope that you have all started the year with lots of sawdust and woodshavings. It's the end of April already, the year is flying by.
We are going to get some t-shirts printed with the club logo. We have not decided on colours or styles so if you have any input please let me know, Vic has organised a great rate with the printer so they will not be too expensive. Let us know if you are interested.

Joe will be taking all membership fees, he is at most meetings, we will have updated statements for all members at some point this term, if you have any questions about your account please ask.
 

Useful dates this term

 

First meeting Tuesday  23rd April

Last meeting Tuesday 25th June



Old Dwyers Mill Collective-Timber sale
Saturday and Sunday 18th &19th May, Leonard's Hill, Vic

Wangaratta Woodworkers is holding it's seventh annual Scroll Saw Weekend (also relevant for pyrographers) on the weekend of 4 - 5 May. 

Albury-Wodonga Woodcrafters are holding the 10th Annual Woodcarving Weekend at the Clubrooms, Wodonga Showgrounds, Wilson St. Wodonga Victoria on Saturday 15 and Sunday 16 June 2019.  Booking is essential, as only 25 places are available. 



New meeting hours-

Tuesday night 7p.m. to 9p.m.

 
Great to see the lathe being used more and members getting to create and learn new skills!
Below is Dan turning a beautiful Yarn Bowl.

Term Project

Each term Brian chooses a term project which we encourage all members to try.
It is an opportunity to showcase your skills, learn new skills and to compare how fellow members complete their projects. There is no limit to what the term project can be, except that it needs to be easily completed in the time allowed. Brian would love to hear your suggestions for future term projects.


This term's project is 'Tool tote'

 
Let your imagination run wild, push the boundaries of your skills, show us what you can do!
 

We had some amazing projects from last term's 'Show & Tell', thanks to everyone for your hard work and creativity, it was great to see the brief expressed in different ways.  I forgot to take photos at the Show & Tell, hopefully someone did and I will add them to the next newsletter.
Masterclass
Each term we will have a masterclass given by a member or a guest. The topic does not have to be woodworking related but does have to be of interest to our members. If any members have any suggestions or if they would like to demonstrate a skill, please let us know.
We have an Instagram account, we will hopefully be using it to engage with the online woodworking community. If you use Instagram please follow us.

Worldwide, buildings produce about 40 percent of all carbon dioxide emissions. While net-zero energy buildings and retrofits can improve those numbers, the construction industry—and, specifically, the materials it uses—has an intrinsic role to play. In Norway, a new high-rise edifice built almost entirely of wood—call it a “plyscraper”—has finally opened its doors. The Mjøstårnet building, which includes a hotel, restaurants, offices, and apartments, stands at 280 feet (18 stories), making it the tallest timber-frame structure in the world.

Could this be a key to creating the sustainable cities of tomorrow? Wood-construction products company Moelven, which was behind the project, thinks so; Mjøstårnet was built using local renewable resources, and since wood stores CO2 throughout its life cycle, no further emissions are released.
Owned by AB Invest and designed by Voll Arkitekter of Trondheim, the nearly 122,000-square-foot edifice is located in Brumunddal, a small city in central Norway, and near the country's largest lake (an area known for its robust timber industry). To construct the tower, builders used glulam and laminated timber beams; both are strong enough to replace carbon-intensive concrete and steel, and require less energy to produce.
Wood buildings do present certain challenges, of course, the biggest being fire safety, and, because the materials are light, they shift more easily under extreme exterior forces. To overcome the latter, large-scale columns and trusses were used; many were left exposed, making them “a vital part of the interior design,” says Øystein Elgsaas, a partner at Voll. The building is also designed to withstand a complete burnout; tests show it will not collapse.
“What excites me the most is that all horizontal and vertical loads on the building are being handled by wooden structures,” says Rune Abrahamsen, chief executive officer of Moelven Limtre, a subsidiary of Moelven that supplied materials for the project. Abrahamsen expects that the global construction industry will see a notable increase in wood framing for tall buildings; hybrid wood, concrete, and steel solutions would be beneficial, too, he indicates. Abrahamsen believes there's likely to be timber construction that breaks the 300-foot barrier within five years, and, in fact, a 1,148-foot, 70-floor wood-framed tower has already been proposed in Tokyo.

That would please Abrahamsen and Elgsaas immensely, it would seem; both say that Mjøstårnet was largely built to help other contractors see what can be done. “The most important aspect of this building,” says Elgsaas, “is to show that it is possible to build large, complex timber buildings, and in that fashion, inspire others to do the same.” That would please Abrahamsen and Elgsaas immensely, it would seem; both say that Mjøstårnet was largely built to help other contractors see what can be done. “The most important aspect of this building,” says Elgsaas, “is to show that it is possible to build large, complex timber buildings, and in that fashion, inspire others to do the same.”

https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/worlds-tallest-timber-framed-building-finally-opens-doors?mbid=social_facebook&utm_brand=ad&utm_social-type=owned&utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social
Hi, I hope everyone enjoys the newsletter, if you have and feedback, positive or negative please don't hesitate to contact me. Many thanks to Paul for his contributions and to Vic for helping with photos and with the mailing list. If you have anything that you would like to add please email it to me, Thanks, Francis
Copyright © 2017 Altona woodworkers club Inc, All rights reserved.

www.altonawoodworkers.club

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Woodwork Club · 2/28 Commercial Road · footscray, Vic 3011 · Australia

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