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One of our great pleasures at this time of the year is standing astride the great stream of books flowing out into the community, both as gifts and as customers' personal reading. We will be closed on the 25th and 26th of December, and on the 1st of January, but otherwise we'll be here to help you with your summer reading requirements. We are open on Saturday 24th from 8:30 until late afternoon. Surprise yourself or someone you know with a book from our shop. 
We wish you a relaxing and enjoyable holiday. 
- Stella & Thomas
 
Church Street is the perfect place to spend time in this summer, with excellent cafes, restaurants, galleries (and now a bookshop!). We love being part of this community. 
 

Hint of the week: Cookbooks make splendid gifts.


 
Visit our website
Follow us on FaceBook
Stroll through our gallery on Instagram




VOLUMES READ
 
STELLA
 
 
That’s My Hat! is a delightful pop-up for children. Using simple brightly coloured shapes - circles, rectangles - Boisrobert and Rigaud have cleverly created a cityscape which becomes increasing complex. Wander through the city looking for the elusive monkey who has taken the hat! Visually attractive and great for engaging young minds.

 
 
 
And a visually stunning pop-up for grown-ups is Creatures of the Deep. Inspired by the nature drawings of Ernst Haeckel, the pop-up mechanisms are wonderfully intricate and the images are delightfully appealing.
 

 
 
In a world of throw-away consumerism and mass-market production lines, expert knowledge and the handcrafted are making a comeback. There is a new appreciation of finely made objects. The Craft and the Makers is a snapshot of what is happening in the world of the modern artisan. The artisans in this handsomely produced book share a keen interest in the traditions of their respective craft, have a passion for their craft, skill in manufacturing, and embrace fresh approaches, to produce beautiful quality objects. Innovative and inspirational, covering many diverse practices, this book is for anyone who loves or is a maker of fine objects.
 






 



 
 
A Monster Calls, recently released as a film, is a stunning novel about Conor’s efforts to deal with his monster. Patrick Ness wrote this book for Siobhan Dowd, who died prematurely from cancer and was unable to write it herself. It is a story of loss, grief and fear; about how we need monsters to enable us to deal with the hardest things in life, and how these monsters are catalysts for our emotions and can be overcome. Whilst the novel deals with some difficult themes, it is also funny and realistic, and avoids being sentimental. The excellent writing is complemented by Jim Kay's evocative illustrations.
 






 
THOMAS
 



















 
 
Barley Patch by Gerald Murnane
This book begins with the question that prompted its author to stop writing for fourteen years: “Must I write?” In finally finding himself capable of addressing this question, Murnane also addresses its corollary: “Why had I written?" What follows is a subtle and often profound examination of the relationship between the ‘actual’ world and the image world from which fiction arises. Inverting the traditional Romantic model of fiction, Murnane disavows the so-called ‘imagination’ and instead stakes out the primary territory of his image world: “what I call for convenience patterns of images, in a place that I call for convenience my mind, wherever it may lie or whatever else it may be a part of”. By emphasising the porosity of a work of fiction, which is “capable of devising a territory more extensive and more detailed by far than the work itself”, Murnane shows that although the territory is landmarked by images introduced from the memory of events or fictions or artworks or other experiences, both author and reader inhabit the spaces between and surrounding these landmarks, find themselves exploring and enlarging the backgrounds of pictures and the spaces surrounding texts, and forming relationships with ‘personages’ who are both part of, and give rise to, the personages of both author and reader. Every region written about implies a further region not yet written about, “a country on the far side of fiction”, inhabited by personages who may be accessible to the personages in fiction but not yet to us. In tracing (and correlating) the memories of the personage of the narrator-Murnane and the memories of the main character in the book he abandoned when he stopped writing, Murnane gives an exacting topography of his mind (“so to call it”) and a precisely worded description of its operations, and of the yearning, distance and loneliness that both underlie and seek remedy in fiction. 

 
 
















 
 
Mildew by Pauline Jonguitid
“I don’t like surprises,” the narrator of Mildew says, “and since the last one had been an affair between my husband and my niece, I was not feeling in the mood for another one.” On the eve of her daughter’s wedding, a woman finds a green spot on her pubis. She scrapes at it half-heartedly but fails to remove it and it rapidly spreads over her lower body, a sort of mould or fungus about which she seems strangely not distressed but even seems to become rather fond of. As she wanders about her house, she wanders also through her memories, particularly concerning her niece, with whom she shares a name (and all the literary doubling that that implies), and the switching of her husband’s affections from the older to the younger Constanza. The further the mildew spreads, the less grip the narrator has on the habitual patterns of her life, or, rather, the less she is gripped by them, and the more her memories are shown to be arbitrary, partial, unreliable, self-seeking (or self-harming). As the mildew spreads, the reader, too, finds their grip on facts loosened and the psychological forces which underlie the narrative send filaments up through the pores in the surface of reality and softly overwhelm both its momentum and its meaning. Despite the great psychological weight carried in this book it is written very lightly and directly, with a sharp pen and not a wasted word, and the damp claustrophobia of the narrator’s mind is perfectly expressed, as is the release she (sort of) experiences as the mould or fungus becomes a symptom and externalises whatever it is that it is a symptom of. Mildew shares the spare, immediate, resonant writing with much other recent Mexican fiction, such as Yuri Herrera’s Signs Preceding the End of the World.
 





 


 
 
Flâneuse: Women walk the city in Paris, New York, Tokyo, Venice and London by Lauren Elkin
To move is to think. To walk without purpose is to move oneself through the fabric of the city, to find and to follow external or internal threads towards new and often unconscious discoveries (if such a thing as an unconscious discovery is not too oxymoronic) about both oneself and one’s environs. The flâneur is an established literary trope, a lens to the superimposition of time and place, so it was high time for Elkin to write this book to trace and reclaim his female equivalent - from George Sand to Martha Gellhorn to Agnes Varda to Sophie Calle - through  literature and history.  Books by contemporary flâneuses currently in the shop include Olivia Laing’s The Lonely City, which shows the author using her solitary wanderings of New York as a way of thinking about isolation, connectedness, politics and art, and Valeria Luiselli’s remarkable Sidewalks.
 
 

 

 
 
Sidewalks by Valeria Luiselli
“A writer is a person who distributes silences and empty spaces,” writes Luiselli, and proceeds to distribute silences and empty spaces to specific locations in various cities around the world (Mexico City, New York, Venice), using these silences and empty spaces to think about everything from the quicksilver of identity to the enduring yet strangely erasable legacies of history, to the penumbral meanings of words. From a manifesto for viewing the city and achieving solitude on a bicycle to speculations on the idea of ‘home’ and the relationship between a place and the individuals who live in it, Luiselli writes with subtlety, elegance and wry humour. This is a book I will enjoy reading again.


 
 


15 Church Street / PO Box 364, Nelson 7010, New Zealand
telephone: 03 9700073
txt: 0211970002
www.volume.nz
books@volume.nz

 

One of our great pleasures at this time of the year is standing astride the great stream of books flowing out into the community, both as gifts and as customers' personal reading. We will be closed on the 25th and 26th of December, and on the 1st of January, but otherwise we'll be here to help you with your summer reading requirements. We are open on Saturday 24th from 8:30 until late afternoon. Surprise yourself or someone you know with a book from our shop. 
We wish you a relaxing and enjoyable break. 
- Stella & Thomas
 
Church Street is the perfect place to spend time in this summer, with excellent cafes, restaurants, galleries (and now a bookshop!). We love being part of this community. 
 

Hint of the week: Cookbooks make splendid gifts.


 
Visit our website
Follow us on FaceBook
Stroll through our gallery on Instagram




VOLUMES READ
 
STELLA
 
 
That’s My Hat! is a delightful pop-up for children. Using simple brightly coloured shapes - circles, rectangles - Boisrobert and Rigaud have cleverly created a cityscape which becomes increasing complex. Wander through the city looking for the elusive monkey who has taken the hat! Visually attractive and great for engaging young minds.

 
 
 
And a visually stunning pop-up for grown-ups is Creatures of the Deep. Inspired by the nature drawings of Ernst Haeckel, the pop-up mechanisms are wonderfully intricate and the images are delightfully appealing.
 

 
 
In a world of throw-away consumerism and mass-market production lines, expert knowledge and the handcrafted are making a comeback. There is a new appreciation of finely made objects. The Craft and the Makers is a snapshot of what is happening in the world of the modern artisan. The artisans in this handsomely produced book share a keen interest in the traditions of their respective craft, have a passion for their craft, skill in manufacturing, and embrace fresh approaches, to produce beautiful quality objects. Innovative and inspirational, covering many diverse practices, this book is for anyone who loves or is a maker of fine objects.
 






 



 
 
A Monster Calls, recently released as a film, is a stunning novel about Conor’s efforts to deal with his monster. Patrick Ness wrote this book for Siobhan Dowd, who died prematurely from cancer and was unable to write it herself. It is a story of loss, grief and fear; about how we need monsters to enable us to deal with the hardest things in life, and how these monsters are catalysts for our emotions and can be overcome. Whilst the novel deals with some difficult themes, it is also funny and realistic, and avoids being sentimental. The excellent writing is complemented by Jim Kay's evocative illustrations.
 






 
THOMAS
 



















 
 
Barley Patch by Gerald Murnane
This book begins with the question that prompted its author to stop writing for fourteen years: “Must I write?” In finally finding himself capable of addressing this question, Murnane also addresses its corollary: “Why had I written?" What follows is a subtle and often profound examination of the relationship between the ‘actual’ world and the image world from which fiction arises. Inverting the traditional Romantic model of fiction, Murnane disavows the so-called ‘imagination’ and instead stakes out the primary territory of his image world: “what I call for convenience patterns of images, in a place that I call for convenience my mind, wherever it may lie or whatever else it may be a part of”. By emphasising the porosity of a work of fiction, which is “capable of devising a territory more extensive and more detailed by far than the work itself”, Murnane shows that although the territory is landmarked by images introduced from the memory of events or fictions or artworks or other experiences, both author and reader inhabit the spaces between and surrounding these landmarks, find themselves exploring and enlarging the backgrounds of pictures and the spaces surrounding texts, and forming relationships with ‘personages’ who are both part of, and give rise to, the personages of both author and reader. Every region written about implies a further region not yet written about, “a country on the far side of fiction”, inhabited by personages who may be accessible to the personages in fiction but not yet to us. In tracing (and correlating) the memories of the personage of the narrator-Murnane and the memories of the main character in the book he abandoned when he stopped writing, Murnane gives an exacting topography of his mind (“so to call it”) and a precisely worded description of its operations, and of the yearning, distance and loneliness that both underlie and seek remedy in fiction. 

 
 
















 
 
Mildew by Pauline Jonguitid
“I don’t like surprises,” the narrator of Mildew says, “and since the last one had been an affair between my husband and my niece, I was not feeling in the mood for another one.” On the eve of her daughter’s wedding, a woman finds a green spot on her pubis. She scrapes at it half-heartedly but fails to remove it and it rapidly spreads over her lower body, a sort of mould or fungus about which she seems strangely not distressed but even seems to become rather fond of. As she wanders about her house, she wanders also through her memories, particularly concerning her niece, with whom she shares a name (and all the literary doubling that that implies), and the switching of her husband’s affections from the older to the younger Constanza. The further the mildew spreads, the less grip the narrator has on the habitual patterns of her life, or, rather, the less she is gripped by them, and the more her memories are shown to be arbitrary, partial, unreliable, self-seeking (or self-harming). As the mildew spreads, the reader, too, finds their grip on facts loosened and the psychological forces which underlie the narrative send filaments up through the pores in the surface of reality and softly overwhelm both its momentum and its meaning. Despite the great psychological weight carried in this book it is written very lightly and directly, with a sharp pen and not a wasted word, and the damp claustrophobia of the narrator’s mind is perfectly expressed, as is the release she (sort of) experiences as the mould or fungus becomes a symptom and externalises whatever it is that it is a symptom of. Mildew shares the spare, immediate, resonant writing with much other recent Mexican fiction, such as Yuri Herrera’s Signs Preceding the End of the World.
 





 


 
 
Flâneuse: Women walk the city in Paris, New York, Tokyo, Venice and London by Lauren Elkin
To move is to think. To walk without purpose is to move oneself through the fabric of the city, to find and to follow external or internal threads towards new and often unconscious discoveries (if such a thing as an unconscious discovery is not too oxymoronic) about both oneself and one’s environs. The flâneur is an established literary trope, a lens to the superimposition of time and place, so it was high time for Elkin to write this book to trace and reclaim his female equivalent - from George Sand to Martha Gellhorn to Agnes Varda to Sophie Calle - through  literature and history.  Books by contemporary flâneuses currently in the shop include Olivia Laing’s The Lonely City, which shows the author using her solitary wanderings of New York as a way of thinking about isolation, connectedness, politics and art, and Valeria Luiselli’s remarkable Sidewalks.
 
 

 

 
 
Sidewalks by Valeria Luiselli
“A writer is a person who distributes silences and empty spaces,” writes Luiselli, and proceeds to distribute silences and empty spaces to specific locations in various cities around the world (Mexico City, New York, Venice), using these silences and empty spaces to think about everything from the quicksilver of identity to the enduring yet strangely erasable legacies of history, to the penumbral meanings of words. From a manifesto for viewing the city and achieving solitude on a bicycle to speculations on the idea of ‘home’ and the relationship between a place and the individuals who live in it, Luiselli writes with subtlety, elegance and wry humour. This is a book I will enjoy reading again.


 
 


15 Church Street / PO Box 364, Nelson 7010, New Zealand
telephone: 03 9700073
txt: 0211970002
www.volume.nz
books@volume.nz

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VOLUME · 15 Church Street (Radio House) · PO Box 364 · Nelson, 7010 · New Zealand

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